The Sandbox

GWOT hot wash, straight from the wire

Welcome to The Sandbox, a forum for service members who have served or are currently serving in Iraq and Afghanistan, returned vets, spouses and caregivers. The Sandbox's focus is not on policy and partisanship (go to our Blowback page for that), but on the unclassified details of deployment -- the everyday, the extraordinary, the wonderful, the messed-up, the absurd. All correspondence is read, and as much as possible is posted, lightly edited. If you know someone who is deployed who might have something to say, please tell them about us. To submit a post click here.

FROM INSURGENTS TO PRE-EMERGENTS |

June 05, 2009

FROM INSURGENTS TO PRE-EMERGENTS
Name: Deployed Teacher
Posting date: 6/5/09
Returned from: Afghanistan
Milblog: Deployed Teacher 
Email: deployedteacher@gmail.com

It's interesting to observe how life has shifted from one focus to another now that I'm home. An example: For six months, it was all about Afghanistan insurgents, now, it's crabgrass pre-emergents. So, for peace of mind, I set out to find similarities between the two that might help make my mental transition easier, and more meaningful.

As I considered a pre-emergent for the lawn/garden, I found an article from the Ohio State University Extension entitled: Pre-Emergent Herbicides Effective for Weed Control. Here are some bullets from the article:

Marestail, giant ragweed and lambsquarter remain some of the most challenging weeds to control for several reasons:

• They become more difficult to control with increasing size and age.

• They are some of the first weeds to emerge in the spring, and marestail grows quickly in size, making proper burndown treatments a must to control them.

• Avoid making post-emergence applications during periods of adverse environmental conditions, such as low temperatures, extended cloudy periods, and drought.

Here's my take on this useful information, uh,... I mean intelligence:

Taliban insurgents and their radical fundamentalist followers are the most difficult to control for several reasons:

• They become more difficult to control with increasing size and rage.

• They are the first to emerge in the spring/summer, and their numbers grow quickly in size, making appropriate engagement/elimination a must.

• Avoid engaging insurgents during periods of adverse environmental conditions, such as low  temperatures, extended cloudy periods, and drought.

Is it a stretch to equate Taliban insurgency with out of control weeds? Mmmm, you tell me -- but if any of you pass by my house and see me vigorously eradicating/eliminating weeds, via airborne or ground assault methods, please consider that my conduct is easily explained by the psychological term, "transference."

Transference: "the redirection of feelings and desires; especially of those unconsciously retained from war, toward a new object." *

* For you psych majors: Yes, I replaced the word "childhood" with "war." Sorry, but it makes
sense.

Comments

Sorry, no air support for the yard. But, there are many advantages and you will grow accustomed to the scale.

Welcome home to the mundane details of domestic tranquility.

Lambsquarter is a delicious and convenient substitute for spinach when young.

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