New Comic Alert! Dadding Badly by John Kovaleski

Dadding Badly by John Kovaleski

 

Dadding Badly documents one dad’s experience of raising a miniature version of himself who can’t talk, walk, forage for food or have any concept of proper bathroom habits.

 

Read Dadding Badly here.





Valentine's Day Gift: Funnies for Your Hunnies

Collectible Comic Prints

 

When it comes to gift-giving this Valentine’s Day, think outside the box (of chocolates)! GoComics offers archive-quality prints of many of our most popular comics!   

 

Perfect for couples just getting to know each other or those in serious relationships, the comic you choose will be printed beautifully on high-quality 11” x 17” paper.

 

Unframed collectible prints featuring customized art of the buyer's choice are available for $39.95. To ensure delivery by Valentine’s Day (and to keep you out of the doghouse), orders must be placed by Feb. 9.

 

 

HOW TO BUY:

 

Once you’ve found the perfect comic strip, select “Buy a Print of this Comic” from the drop-down menu.

 

 

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Or, click “Get this Collectible Archive Quality Print” in the sidebar.

 

 

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Start browsing available features for purchase here!

 





10 Comics That Are Just What the Doctor Ordered

Did you know that laughter is scientifically proven to help increase blood flow and boost the immune system? Or that laughter also relieves stress by increasing chemicals that help with relaxation? Basically, a good, hard chuckle is vital to living a happy, healthy life!

 

In honor of today (Jan. 24) being Global Belly Laugh Day, the GoComics Doctors of Laughter have prescribed a double dose of giggles to all of our readers! Assisting us in this humor operation are 10 of this month’s funniest comics:

 

Lunarbaboon by Christopher Grady
Lunarbaboon by Christopher Grady

 

Gil by Norm Feuti
Gil by Norm Feuti

 

Lio by Mark Tatulli
Lio by Mark Tatulli

 

Frazz by Jef Mallett
Frazz by Jef Mallett

 

Wrong Hands by John Atkinson
Wrong Hands by John Atkinson

 

Fowl Language by Brian Gordon
Fowl Language by Brian Gordon

 

Calvin and Hobbes by Bill Watterson
Calvin and Hobbes by Bill Watterson

 

Loose Parts by Dave Blazek
Loose Parts by Dave Blazek

 

Jim Benton Cartoons by Jim Benton
Jim Benton Cartoons by Jim Benton

 

Reality Check by Dave Whamond
Reality Check by Dave Whamond

 

Check out more belly-laugh-inducing comics, here.

 





Guest Post: Wes Molebash of Molebashed

Wes Molebash Event

 

Heads up, GoComics fans! Molebashed creator Wes Molebash has an exciting speaking event coming up on February 2! Read on to hear from Wes himself:

 

Hey, everybody! I'm Wes Molebash, creator of the family comic strip Molebashed, which you can read right here on GoComics!

 

Like a lot of cartoonists, I fell in love with comics and cartoons at a very early age. I read every Calvin and Hobbes collection, I studied the art of film animation and I learned everything I could about Walt Disney. When I was in fourth grade, I learned how to draw my own comic strips, a craft that I've been striving to perfect over the past 26 years. While the art of drawing comics has been fun and challenging, I've found that the business of comics is a much more difficult beast to tame. I'm constantly trying to figure out the best way to distribute and monetize my comic feature in a world where newspapers are becoming less relevant and the Internet is continuously being clogged with junk. I don't have it all figured out, but I do have some strong opinions.

 

On Tuesday, Feb. 2, I'll be speaking to the Chillicothe Art League at The Pump House Art Gallery in Chillicothe, Ohio. The evening begins at 7 p.m. and should conclude around 8:30. I'll be speaking about how I got my start in comics as well as a few of the "strong opinions" I've formed over the past 10 years of being a published cartoonist. There will also be time for a little Q&A. This event is absolutely free and open to the public. If you're in the area, I'd love to see you there!

 

For more information, check out the event page on Facebook!

 

Read Molebashed here.





ICYMI: Twitter Q&A with T. Shepherd (Snow Sez)

image from https://s3.amazonaws.com/feather-client-files-aviary-prod-us-east-1/2016-01-14/3f438032f03848419308dcd69e5cd2c5.png

 

Thank you to T. Shepherd, creator of Snow Sezfor joining fans on Twitter today for a live Q&A! If you missed the chance to chat, catch up on Twitteror use the widget below:

 

 

Subscribe to Snow Sez!

 

Next up (Friday, Jan. 29): We’re talking with the two creators behind hilarious new comic Mustard and Boloney, Jeffrey Caulfield and Alexandre Rouillard.

 





Our Resident Expert Helps You Answer Your Cat’s Questions

Are you celebrating Answer Your Cat’s Questions Day today (Jan. 22)? Though a Q&A with your furry friend may initially seem daunting (cats certainly have a mind of their own), we have a comic that can help you prepare.

 

In Charles Brubaker’s Ask a Cat, humans are finally able to ask questions to a cat. Gain invaluable insight into the inner workings of the feline brain, as Cat answers real letters sent to him by readers like you:

 

Ask a Cat by Charles Brubaker
Ask a Cat by Charles Brubaker

 

Have questions of your own? Email Cat at: goaskthecat@gmail.com!

 

Stay updated on all things catty! Subscribe to Ask a Cat comics, here.





COMICS SHERPA: EDITOR'S PICKS

This recurring LAUGH TRACKS feature highlights individual Sherpa strips and panels that for one reason or another caught the fancy of the aide de sherpa. It could be anything; the drawing, the writing, the humor, the coloring, that they tried something interesting, or that it's a new step for that particular creator.


We hope this quirky sampler will alert you to features you might not yet have noticed amid Sherpa's abundant, ever-changing, and eclectic mix, and that it gives Sherpa creators a modicum of helpful feedback.

 

 

 

And now...  1-20-16

 

 

 

Dysconnected  1-20-16

 

 

 

 

Magic Coffee Hair  1-20-16

 

 

 

 

 

1-20-16

 

 

 

 

Today's Trump  1-20-16

 

 

 

 

 

Cleo and Company  1-21-16

 

 

 

 

 

1-21-16

 

 

 

 

 

 

A complete list of all the Sherpa features can be found here.

 

 





GoComics A to Z, Vol. 23: Leigh Luna Comics

A weekly feature spotlighting new & unusual features on the GoComics A-Z roster

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Feature: Clementine Fox (Leigh Luna Comics)
Creator: Leigh Luna
Format: large format
Frequency: every Monday
Recommended if you like: Fairy tales & adventures stories, The Chronicles of Narnia, Watership Down, Rupert Bear, A Midsummer Night's Dream

 

Because I have two small children, I spend a lot of time reading illustrated children's books (OK, I admit I owned many of them years before having kids. It's a great genre!). One of our favorite series is "Rupert," the British illustrated children's stories featuring the adventures of a bear and his various animal and fairy tale friends. The stories begin innocently enough, with something unusual happening in the house, backyard or village, but within a few pages you're swept up on some kind of adventure featuring mysterious villains, friendly fairies, and imaginative, unfamiliar environments. Leigh Luna's "Clementine Fox" adventure has all of those elements, and before I had finished reading the very first comic, I knew I'd be looking through the entire adventure, which updates every Monday. Each installment is about the equivalent of the page in a large comic/children's book, but the detail, shading and perspective in Luna's black-and-white illustrations gives them a life and depth that makes them each feel like an illustrated episode that you can spend some time with. (The strip occasionally breaks into color as well, such as the month of December 2014).

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The perspective in these strips is usually focused on the characters, but it occasionally opens up to wide vistas of the forests and hillside, heightening the sense that you're on an epic journey. Clementine Fox, Penelope Rabbit and Nubbins the Squirrel are a fun trio to cheer on, and the characters they meet along the way are entertaining as well. The dialogue isn't especially wordy or complex, (sometimes there are no words at all) but I've found the strip is best enjoyed if you take your time and read through them slowly. Oh yeah, and Nubbin' penchant for turning acorns into a sippable refreshment is pretty cool as well. I'm looking forward to accompanying this crew on future adventures, and to keeping up with the work of this enormously talented cartoonist.

 

Read more Leigh Luna Comics right here on GoComics.

 

 





"Fowl Language: Welcome to Parenting" Available for Preorder

Fowl Language Welcome to Parenting by Brian Gordon

 

 

“Parenting can be joyous and fulfilling, but it’s also often hard and gross.” Sound familiar? You’re not alone, as Brian Gordon’s Fowl Language is here to show.

 

An unvarnished look at the tedium and aggravation of parenting, with the never-fading love for our children, Fowl Language pokes fun at the daily struggles faced by parents, helping us to feel less alone in our continual struggle to stay sane.

 

Our publishing division is releasing “Fowl Language: Welcome to Parenting” in March, and we’re hearing shouts of excitement from our friends at Adweek and Upworthy!

 

 

Fowl Language by Brian Gordon

 

 

Preorder “Fowl Language: Welcome to Parenting” here. Read Fowl Language on GoComics here.





Giveaway: "Adulthood is a Myth" by Sarah Andersen

Adulthood is a Myth by Sarah Andersen

 

We’re thrilled for the March 8 release of Sarah Andersen’s “Adulthood is a Myth!”

 

If you follow Sarah’s Scribbles, you’re already familiar with Andersen’s hilarious, all-too-true comics depicting life as a young adult. “Adulthood is a Myth” is a collection of some of these amazing comics, PLUS many brand-new ones!

 

As we eagerly await the release, we’re giving away one copy of “Adulthood is a Myth” before it hits shelves!

 

To enter, leave a comment on this blog post with a link to the Sarah’s Scribbles cartoon on GoComics that you find the most relatable – browse the archive here. To be counted, you must include your first and last name or handle.

 

This contest will end Tues., Jan. 26 at 10 a.m. CT. One winner will be randomly selected and announced that day on the GoComics blog.

 

Are you as excited as we are? Pre-order a copy of “Adulthood is a Myth” here.





4 Frightening Sights of Winter

Dog Eat Doug by Brian Anderson
Dog Eat Doug by Brian Anderson

 

 

As if the chilly winter air isn’t cold enough to do the trick, these winter sightings will send a shiver down your spine:

 

 

1. Gorgeous-gone-grungy snowmen.

 

 

Buni by Ryan Pagelow
Buni by Ryan Pagelow

 

 

Buni by Ryan Pagelow
Buni by Ryan Pagelow



 

2. Two words: Snow Goons.

 

 

Calvin and Hobbes by Bill Watterson
Calvin and Hobbes by Bill Watterson

 

 

3. Think nosy neighbors are bad? Try snowsy neighbors.

 

 

Garfield by Jim Davis
Garfield by Jim Davis

 

 

4. The most frightening of all – the angry, weathered-by-winter snow shoveler.

 

 

The Flying McCoys by Glenn and Gary McCoy
The Flying McCoys by Glenn and Gary McCoy

 

See more eerie spottings – view our “Mythical Creatures” collection here.





Giveaway: Signed Tank McNamara Print – Winner Announced

Tank McNamara by Bill Hinds

 

Thank you to all who entered to win an archive-quality, SIGNED Tank McNamara print by sharing your favorite Tank McNamara comic from 2015.

 

We've randomly selected one winner who named the September 25 comic strip as his favorite! Congratulations, Mike Herman! Please contact us at rewards@gocomics.com with your shipping address and phone number. Please note: You must contact us by 1/26/16 or your prize will be forfeited.

 

There's still time to submit your nomination for the "Sports Jerk of the Year" Award! Find instructions here.

 

Stay tuned! The next giveaway will be announced on 1/20/16 at 6 a.m. CT.





Unleash Your Creativity With GoComics Fan Art This Month!

Are you riding the wave of inspiration? We hope the answer is “YES!” because we want you to join us in celebrating International Creativity Month! Whether you’re a professional artist or an avid doodler, let’s get those creative juices flowing this January, because …

 

Channel your inner cartoonist and pay homage to ours, by creating a rendition of your favorite characters/scenes from GoComics. Once your masterpiece is complete, share it publicly on Facebook, Twitter or Instagram, using the hashtag: #GCFanArt and you could win an archive-quality print of your favorite comic on GoComics. One lucky winner will be announced on the aforementioned social networks on Sunday, Jan 31.

 

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To see more stellar fan art examples, visit gocomics.com/fan-art!





COMICS SHERPA: EDITOR'S PICKS

This recurring LAUGH TRACKS feature highlights individual Sherpa strips and panels that for one reason or another caught the fancy of the aide de sherpa. It could be anything; the drawing, the writing, the humor, the coloring, that they tried something interesting, or that it's a new step for that particular creator.


We hope this quirky sampler will alert you to features you might not yet have noticed amid Sherpa's abundant, ever-changing, and eclectic mix, and that it gives Sherpa creators a modicum of helpful feedback.

 

 

 

1-15-16

 

 

 

 

Minihahas  1-15-16

 

 

 

 

Dysconnected  1-17-16

 

 

 

 

View from the Couch  1-17-16

 

 

 

Batch Rejection  1-18-16

 

 

 

 

 

1-18-16

 

 

 

1-18-16

 

 

 

 

Smith  1-18-16

 

 

 

Something about Celeste  1-18-16

 

 

 

 

 

Zombie Heights  1-18-16

 

 

 

 

A complete list of all the Sherpa features can be found here.

 

 





ICYMI: Prickly City Podcast Now on Rivet Radio

Can’t get enough Carmen and Winslow? You’re in luck, because creator Scott Stantis’ Prickly City Podcast is back by popular demand on Rivet Radio! Hear from Stantis himself, and get the inside scoop on Prickly City by listening online, or downloading the Rivet Radio app

 

 





New Comic Alert! The Worried Well by Dana Maier

The Worried Well by Dana Maier

 

 

Dana Jeri Maier's comics provide useful advice, philosophical musings and spot-on witticisms. She shows us ourselves, not unkindly, as silly and vain and self-involved. Her cartoons feel very interior, a mind watching the world and muttering to itself. They're what that person standing by themselves at the party, not talking to anyone, pretending to look vaguely interested in nothing in particular, has been secretly thinking the whole time.

 

Read The Worried Well here.





Let Freedom Ring: Cartoonists Celebrate Martin Luther King, Jr. Day

Joe Heller by Joe Heller
Joe Heller by Joe Heller

 

Today, we honor minister, activist and visionary Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., for his unwavering commitment to making the world a better place. He once said, “The ultimate measure of a man is not where he stands in moments of comfort and convenience, but where he stands at times of challenge and controversy.” As someone who dared to dream of peace and equality for all, despite the prejudices he faced as an African-American, Dr. King was the true embodiment of a leader.

 

Below is a collection of thought-provoking, sentimental and humorous comics honoring Martin Luther King Jr.:

 

Nancy by Guy Gilchrist
Nancy by Guy Gilchrist

 

Frazz by Jef Mallett
Frazz by Jef Mallett

 

Connie to the Wonnie by Connie Sun
Connie to the Wonnie by Connie Sun

 

Grand Avenue by Steve Breen and Mike Thompson
Grand Avenue by Steve Breen and Mike Thompson

 

View the full collection of tributes to Martin Luther King Jr. here.





Happy Kid Inventors Day (K.I.D.)!

Kid Inventors Day is celebrated every year on January 17: the birthday of one of America’s all-time greatest inventors, Benjamin Franklin, who began dreaming up designs at the mere age of 12! Franklin isn’t the only child whose inventions changed our world. Many of today’s most popular gizmos and gadgets – like television, earmuffs and the Popsicle, to name a few – were all thought up by kids.

 

Today, we’re celebrating the ingenuity and creativity of children by honoring some of GoComics’ very own wise-beyond-their-years kid inventors.

 

As Thatababy reminds us, one of the most important qualities in any inventor is the ability to put a new, innovative twist(y straw) on average things.

 

Thatababy by Paul Trap
Thatababy by Paul Trap

 

Like Calvin, many young geniuses are often misunderstood and ahead of their time.

 

Calvin and Hobbes by Bill Watterson
Calvin and Hobbes by Bill Watterson

 

The best part of being an inventor is using your brainpower to do some good in the world:

 

Lio by Mark Tatulli
Lio by Mark Tatulli

 

And to help you further your goals (like Nate’s goal of getting a girlfriend):

 

Big Nate by Lincoln Peirce
Big Nate by Lincoln Peirce

 

Then comes the truly fun part: getting to sell your finished product:

 

FoxTrot by Bill Amend
FoxTrot by Bill Amend

 

For more inspiration and fun for kids, check out these two innovative reads from our publishing division:

 

Candy Experiments by Loralee Leavitt
Candy Experiments by Loralee Leavitt

 

Sneaky Uses for Everyday Things by Cy Tymony
Sneaky Uses for Everyday Things by Cy Tymony

 





COMICS SHERPA: EDITOR'S PICKS

This recurring LAUGH TRACKS feature highlights individual Sherpa strips and panels that for one reason or another caught the fancy of the aide de sherpa. It could be anything; the drawing, the writing, the humor, the coloring, that they tried something interesting, or that it's a new step for that particular creator.


We hope this quirky sampler will alert you to features you might not yet have noticed amid Sherpa's abundant, ever-changing, and eclectic mix, and that it gives Sherpa creators a modicum of helpful feedback.

 

 


 Cleo and Company  1-12-16

 

 

Don't Pick the Flowers  1-12-16

 

 

 

1-12-16

 

 


 

 

Onion & Pea  1-13-16

 

 

 

 

Picpak Dog  1-13-16

 


 

AJ & Magnus  1-14-16

 

 

 

 

BigJim  1-14-16

 

 

1-14-16

 

 

 

No Ambiguity  1-14-16

 

 

 

 

Oscar and Annie  1-14-16

 

 

 

 

 

A complete list of all the Sherpa features can be found here.

 

 





Meet Your Creator: Carl Skanberg (That New Carl Smell)

MYC_blog_header

 

The GoComics “Meet Your Creator” series brings you firsthand insight into the lives and careers of your favorite cartoonists. Each week, we hand over the keys to one of our talented creators, who share their inspirations, achievements, creative processes, studios and more! Read on to hear from this week’s featured cartoonist: Carl Skanberg of That New Carl Smell.

 

Let me explain. I have noticed how “Carl” is a funny name to a lot of you: Commercials, TV neighbors, blue-collar nobodies, Gary Larson comics, idiot relatives, dopey cops. Basically, when a writer is thinking of the dullest, most unimpressive, dumb-guy name, “Carl” is a common choice. I’ve noticed. Don’t think I haven’t noticed. But I’m taking it back! I decided to name all of the dumb guys “Carl” in my comic. I’m going to saturate the comedy market with Carl. Someday, it’ll be uncool to make jokes about Carl. I mean, unless your name is Carl, like me. Then it’ll still be cool. Clearly.   

 

 

2 Broke Gulls by Carl Skanberg        Fantasy by Carl Skanberg

 

 

I was four years old, drawing pictures at my Grandma’s kitchen table, and I made a picture of a worm on roller skates. A short time after that, the Chicago Sun-Times published a Ziggy cartoon of a worm on roller skates. Everyone was blown away. “Holy cats, Carl has the potential to be a real cartoonist! He drew his roller skate worm before Ziggy!” I felt pretty good and I learned an important lesson that day: Being a newspaper cartoonist is as easy as drawing a worm on roller skates that you saw on Sesame Street. Until now, I never spoiled the myth about my worm on roller skates originally appearing on Sesame Street. Making a living with doodles from the kitchen table may be a myth, as well.

 

 

Worm - Carl Skanberg

 

 

I have a really bad doodling habit. If you see me in a social setting and I look awkward, it’s because I don’t know what to do with my hands and brain without a pencil and paper in my hand. All through my school days and into my life as a grownup, everyone knows me as the guy who is always drawing. I work in the printing and marketing industry, but I have a job that has very little to do with doodling. I’ve worked for the same fine company for more than 18 years. I’m 40 years old, I’m married, I have four kids and did I mention I’m a fully grown man with a sketchbook? I ride the rush-hour train, in the big city of Chicago, and I openly draw pictures of funny cartoon animals and interestingly shaped people, for no good reason. 

 

My first newspaper comic strip was published in Illinois State University’s student paper. It was a simple comic featuring a bear and bird and some other animals. There was no big concept. The bear and bird told a ton of bad jokes and got punched in the face a lot. The cartoon was named Best Cartoon or Panel by the Illinois College Press Association in 1996. I drew it for a couple years at school and for a semester after graduation. People seemed to like it, but the comic syndicates had very little interest. I decided to end that strip and attempt a new comic that might catch the eye of a newspaper syndicate. Every year between 1998 to 2005, roughly one new fully realized comic idea was rejected by all newspaper and syndicate professionals who saw my work.

 

My friends and coworkers continued to enjoy these unpublished comics, so I decided to create a webcomic for this smaller group. The Chicago White Sox had just won the 2005 World Series and everyone was pretty excited about it. My new cartoon became a serial comic strip story that followed the ups and downs of the White Sox throughout the 2006 season. I cast the White Sox as a band of pirates who battled other pirate crews (the Pittsburgh Pirates were a baseball team) on their quest for more gold. Before the real White Sox got out of spring training, I was contacted by a local newspaper in the Chicago suburbs, and they wanted to run my comic in their sports section. Around the same time, the VP of acquisitions at Universal Press Syndicate contacted me to ask if I’d ever thought about creating a comic for syndication. I said, “Yes. I’ve thought about it. In fact, I have a bunch of rejection letters on your letterhead.” He said, “Well. The White Sox aren’t popular enough for syndication, but keep me in mind as you come up with other things.”

 

 

Palehose Six by Carl Skanberg

 

 

I followed the White Sox, in serial story mode, for three seasons. After they were pirates, they were space travelers in 2007 and they were a Quixotic band of knights in 2008. I self-published a book with these comics in 2009, and quickly sold all of them. Beyond the White Sox stories, the newspaper published my weekly panel, “Smells Like Mascot,” to cover all Chicago sports. In 2013, the local suburban newspaper eliminated most of their budget for unique sports content, and “Smells Like Mascot” went with it. I soon started creating a daily non-sports comic panel for a general audience, and I got back in touch with my friend at Universal Press Syndicate. He thought the new comics were a good fit for GoComics, and That New Carl Smell was born.

 

 

That New Carl Smell by Carl Skanberg

 

 

On a side note, I was the Illinois State University mascot, Reggie Redbird, for a couple years. I know the smell of a mascot. The smells sticks with ya.

 

The recent stretch of seven years as a newspaper cartoonist was good for consistency and sticking to deadlines. Creating a webcomic is the opposite. I’d like to thank all of the people who follow my work at GoComics, and I apologize for going into weird patterns. The first few months of That New Carl Smell was a daily comic that would fit in a newspaper, but it was not in a newspaper. So, then, what the heck is a webcomic? There was a stretch when the comic was drawn on 4” x 6” cards and I physically mailed them to friends, as postcards, because I thought it was most important for friends to have tangible art. Then, I painted some comics with acrylic paint on wood, and some in watercolor, and some in gouache. I’ve taken a lot of photos of my comics, rather than scanning them, to take a step away from the digital version of the art. I hope all of these experiments are more entertaining than annoying. Thanks for sticking around. I have not figured it out, yet. And I don’t think I can kick my doodling habit.

 

 

Carl Skanberg      Carl Skanberg

 

 

Carl Skanberg
My workspace is wherever I can find it. This is my kitchen table, with my kids.

 

Read That New Carl Smell here. Follow Carl on Twitter here. And, check out Carl’s blog.





New Comics on GoComics

Enter this week's GoComics giveaway!

Meet Your GoComics Creator: A behind-the-scenes glimpse into the lives of our talented creators.





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