COMICS SHERPA: EDITOR'S PICKS

This recurring LAUGH TRACKS feature highlights individual Sherpa strips and panels that for one reason or another caught the fancy of the aide de sherpa. It could be anything; the drawing, the writing, the humor, the coloring, that they tried something interesting, or that it's a new step for that particular creator.

 

We hope this quirky sampler will alert you to features you might not yet have noticed amid Sherpa's abundant, ever-changing, and eclectic mix, and that it gives Sherpa creators a modicum of helpful feedback.

 
 

 

Buns 8-24-15

 

 

 

 

Green Pieces  8-24-15

 

 

 

 

Kartoons By Kline  8-24-15

 

 

 

 

Lili and Derek  8-24-15

 

 

 

 

Magnificatz  8-24-15

 

 

8-24-15

 

Onion & Pea  8-24-15

 

 

 

 

Sooky Rottweiler  8-24-15

 

 

 

 

The Beauforts  8-24-15

 

 

 

 

The Insolent Lemon  8-24-15

 

 

 

 

 

A complete list of all the Sherpa features can be found here. 

 

 

 





GoComics Exclusive: Naughty Pete by Charles Forbell

As of this past Friday (August 21), one of the greatest masterpieces in cartoon history is being featured exclusively on GoComics, in Peter Maresca’s Origins of the Sunday Comics!

 

Charles Forbell’s Naughty Pete originally appeared in the 1913, during the age of the Fantasy Comic Strip – an imaginative genre of cartoon stories, brought to life by the invention of color printing. An almost-forgotten gem, Naughty Pete disappeared shortly after its debut, making it one of the great, lost treasures of the comics world … until now!

 

Origins of the Sunday Comics by Peter Maresca
Origins of the Sunday Comics by Peter Maresca

 

Read the full 18-Sunday run from the beginning, here, in Origins of the Sunday Comics. 





Weekend Faves (August 23)

Adult Children by Stephen Beals
Adult Children by Stephen Beals

One of life's crueler ironies.

--Julie

 

 

Pickles by Brian Crane
Pickles by Brian Crane

It's far safer to just film the cat.
--Elizabeth

 

 

FoxTrot by Bill Amend
FoxTrot by Bill Amend

So many suppressed sand nightmares coming back to me right now. I was terrified of these books/movies growing up.

--Amanda

 

 

Lio by Mark Tatulli
Lio by Mark Tatulli

A fabulous tribute to the re-launch of Bloom County by Tatulli! If you've been living under a rock, learn more about the return of Bloom County here.

--Lindsay

 

 

Garfield by Jim Davis
Garfield by Jim Davis

Ah, yes. The armpit snuggle. A favorite of total weirdo dogs everywhere.

--Elizabeth





Pluto Demoted Day

After years of science classes, it’s not easy to accept that our solar system does not contain nine planets as we were previously taught, but eight.

 

B.C. by Mastroianni and Hart
B.C. by Mastroianni and Hart

 

 

Prickly City by Scott Stantis
Prickly City by Scott Stantis

 

Exactly nine years ago today, the International Astronomical Union downgraded the status of Pluto to “dwarf planet.” Marking the memorable day, Pluto Demoted Day is now celebrated on August 24 each year.

 

Pluto now finds itself to be the butt of many jokes.

 

 

Soup to Nutz by Rick Stromoski
Soup to Nutz by Rick Stromoski

 

 

B.C. by Mastroianni and Hart
B.C. by Mastroianni and Hart

 

 

But, Pluto-enthusiasts know life just isn’t the same without the beloved ninth planet.

 

 

Adam@Home by Rob Harrell
Adam@Home by Rob Harrell

 

 

Moderately Confused by Jeff Stahler
Moderately Confused by Jeff Stahler




New Comic Alert! 1 and Done by Eric Scott

1 and Done by Eric Scott

 

A brand-new comic from Back in the Day creator Eric Scott!

 

These cartoon panels are not unlike the solar panels available at your local hardware store. Virtually maintenance-free. Top grade efficiency. Ideal for any location. Impact resistant. Excellent long-life performance under high temperature. Will withstand heavy winds and snow loads up to 120 pounds per square foot. Plus, they’re funnier.

 

Read 1 and Done here.





8 Signs You're a Comics Fan

The term “comics” encompasses a wide variety of works, from graphic novels to comic books, printed features to webcomics, some funny and some serious – thus, making the comics community a very diverse place. Despite the wide variety, comic fans aren’t hard to recognize. In addition to your passion, knowledge and devotion, here are 8 telltale signs that you’re a member of this funny fan base:

 

1. Like Elizabeth in a previous Weekend Faves post, as someone who knows the ins and outs of the comics world, you read the following comic and think, “This is what it’s like to have a conversation with me”: 

 

Ordinary Bill by William Wilson
Ordinary Bill by William Wilson

 

2. You and your mom both know that, when it comes to bad moods, there’s no cure-all like a comic book.

 

Calvin and Hobbes by Bill Watterson
Calvin and Hobbes by Bill Watterson

 

3. Misplaced comics = maximum panic. 

 

Peanuts by Charles Schulz
Peanuts by Charles Schulz

 

4.  You can think of no more horrifying a nightmare than this:

 

Close to Home by John McPherson
Close to Home by John McPherson

 

5. Deciding on your costume for Comic-Con is one of the hardest decisions you make all year.

 

FoxTrot by Bill Amend
FoxTrot by Bill Amend

 

6. Such a hard decision, in fact, that you often take them for test runs before the big event.

 

Marmaduke by Brad Anderson
Marmaduke by Brad Anderson

 

7. Speaking of Comic-Con, you know you’ve met your soul mate when …

 

Working Daze by John Zakour and Scott Roberts
Working Daze by John Zakour and Scott Roberts

 

8. Reading this post about our GoComics’ comics fans felt like coming full circle:

 

Cul de Sac by Richard Thompson
Cul de Sac by Richard Thompson




Meet Your Creator: John McPherson (Close to Home)

 

Close to Home on GoComics

 

 

 

Most of the cartoonists I’ve ever met tell me that they knew they wanted to be a cartoonist since they were very young. The inspiration did not hit me until I was about 24 and out of college and out of work. I got my degree in mechanical engineering in 1983 from Bucknell University at a time when jobs for engineers were scarce. It was during that time of job searching that I started playing around with cartooning. 

 

I always loved comics as a kid and read the funny pages voraciously. Though I did follow some strips, I always gravitated toward single-panel cartoons because I liked the immediacy of the humor of single-panels. As a kid, I liked Grin and Bear It, Herman and anything by Charles Addams. Later, I loved The Far Side. For a few years in college, I started having cartoon ideas pop into my head and started writing them down in my college notebooks. I was very eager to see my ideas drawn up and thought of sending them off to a cartoonist to see if he or she would put them on paper. But, I didn't know any cartoonists, so I was left to my own devices. I had no art experience at all; nonetheless, I sat down one day and forced myself to draw. I picked out my favorite idea and drew it up. It took me about eight hours to finish it, and when I got done, it looked like a chimpanzee hyped up on caffeine had done. Nevertheless, it felt great to see it on paper. 

 

 

Close to Home on GoComics

 

 

So I drew up another, and another.  And after a few weeks, I had a dozen cartoons completed. I made photocopies of them and sent them off to a small newspaper that ran twice a month in a nearby town. To my amazement, they liked my stuff, and agreed to run one cartoon an issue, for a whopping $5 a month. I remember running to a newsstand to see that first cartoon in print. That is one of the great things about cartooning: There have been so many highlights along the way.

 

After I broke into that paper, I started churning out more cartoons and began sending them off to magazines, which pay much better than $5 a cartoon. I used the book "The Artist's Market" to find magazines and would mail about eight cartoons along with a self-addressed, stamped envelope, and off they would go. I sent out 150 batches of cartoons and got 150 straight rejection letters. But I really didn't care — I was having so much fun cartooning that getting something into a magazine would have just been icing on the cake. 

 

 

 

Close to Home on GoComics

 

 

After a year and a half of sending out cartoons, I finally got two accepted in Campus Life Magazine, a monthly magazine for high school and college students. Campus Life paid me $50 each, and to get a hundred bucks for two cartoons felt great. From there on out, I became a regular contributor to Campus Life. Their editor, Chris Lutes, gave me lots of freedom to be really out there and explore the crazy side of teenage life. Within a year, they were running full-page layouts of my cartoons on various teen themes. It gave me great exposure and a nice side income. 

 

I found that once I had broken the ice with Campus Life, it was much easier to break into other magazines. The visibility that I got with Campus Life also resulted in editors from other magazines contacting me to work for them. I soon got into another teen magazine called Breakaway, and started writing a monthly humor column and drew a comic strip, The Adventures of Buck Felner. It was nice to be doing some writing and a fun shift to do a comic strip, which is SO different than doing a panel. Around the same time, I got into Yankeee magazine. Yankee paid $100 a cartoon and was a national newsstand magazine, which gave me more great exposure. I quickly added The Saturday Evening Post to the mix, which continues to be a great outlet for panel cartoonists.

 

 

Close to Home on GoComics

 

 

From 1985 to 1987, I worked my way into about 40 publications on a regular basis. I also lined up several assignments doing book illustration, which was a lot of fun. It was nice to be able to just focus on drawing and not have to worry as much about the humor when I did illustration work. The illustration work also paid very well. 

 

By 1990, I was making more money moonlighting as a cartoonist than I was at my engineering job, and was having a blast at it. So I started to think seriously about leaving my engineering job. One day, I just made the decision to go full-time as a cartoonist. I would be giving up a steady paycheck and lots of benefits, but I loved the freedom and creativity of cartooning and knew that was where I wanted to go. In July 1990, at age 30, I quit my day job and never looked back.

 

Things went well right from the start. I continued to pick up new magazines. I found it best to simply call editors and art directors rather than writing, and to this day, I use that method to break into markets. Somehow, making that voice connection opens doors much better than a letter does.

 

 

Close to Home on GoComics

 

I freelanced for two years and loved not having to go into an office and calling my own shots — it was just really fun. I loved working with different editors, having the phone ring with new assignments and juggling the different projects. Always a new horizon to reach for.

 

In 1992, I approached two syndicates about starting a panel feature and was very fortunate to get offers from both of them. Creators and Universal each offered me a contract, but I quickly made the decision to go with Universal since I admired so many of the strips that it carried. It was a great decision as it continues to be a fantastic partner in the business and just a tremendous organization.

 

Close To Home launched in 55 papers in November 1992, and Universal did a really nice job of growing the feature. It continues to be a really fun career, despite the challenges that papers are facing.

 

Read Close to Home here.





Laugh Tracks Look Back (August 15 – 21)

We know life can get busy! At the end of each week, we compile the most pressing GoComics blog posts from the week to ensure you didn’t miss a thing!

 

LaughTracks_LookBack_Header

 

 

The talented Steve McGarry filled us in on his cartooning history, career and upcoming projects in a “Meet Your Creator” installment.

 

“What I enjoy most about the creative world is that you find yourself going off on unexpected tangents, and that always excites me. It's been that way all through my career. I started out messing around in music and became a record-sleeve designer. I went from drawing for children's comics to being a newspaper illustrator and from there began creating daily comic strips. For a time in the late 1970s, I was a partner with a record producer friend in a commercial production venture. We offered ad agencies a full service from storyboarding to AVproduction. My partner wrote jingles and we would record the tracks ourselves, playing all the instruments and doing all the vocal overdubs – I even did the actual voiceovers!”

 

 

GoComics Spotlight: Shutterbug Follies by Jason Little

 

GoComics Spotlight

 

 

NEW COMIC: Promises, Promises by J.R. Faulkner

 

Promises, Promises by J.R. Faulkner

 

 

When productivity hits an all-time low, it’s time for team-building.

 

The Meaning of Lila on GoComics

 

 

In celebration of Calvin and Hobbes’ upcoming 30th anniversary, we’re giving away a “Stripped” DVD and poster.

 

Stripped Giveaway

 

 

 

Time Flies When You’re Having Fun: We celebrate joking 365 days of the year at GoComics.

 

 

Curse you, Red Baron! Honoring National Aviation Day, we took a look at Snoopy’s many brave adventures.

 

Curse You, Red Baron

 

 

 

Coloring isn't just for kids!

 

Betty on GoComics

 

“It may sound childish, but coloring is the latest craze sweeping the nation. With unique, intricate designs geared for adults, coloring is not only fun, it's also relaxing and therapeutic.”

 

In honor of National Roller Coaster Day, we rode along with the thrill-seekers of GoComics.

 

National Roller Coaster Day

 

 

 

 We channeled our inner-poet with a hilarious haiku for National Poet’s Day.

 

“Calvin writes poems

That Hobbes never finds funny,

But you surely will.”

 

 

Important Reminder: Always follow cell phone protocol.   

 

Comics for a Mobile Generation

 

 

We hosted a live Q&A with John Lotshaw.

 

 

#AskJohnLotshaw
 

 

Have a great weekend! 





ICYMI: Twitter Q&A with John Lotshaw (Co-Creator of Random Acts of Nancy)

JohnLotshaw_3

Thanks to cartoonist John Lotshaw for joining us on Twitter this week for a live Q&A! If you missed out on the chat, catch up here, or browse the tweets below:

 

 

Subscribe to Random Acts of Nancy here!

 

 

NEXT UP (Fri., 8/28): Michael McParlane of Mac comics will join us on Twitter. Tweet in using #AskMcParlane! 




Get Your Inner-Poet On

Happy Poet’s Day! This may seem a little off-the-wall, but we see poetry a lot on GoComics, our comic characters never afraid to embrace their poetic side! Inspired by their funny rhymes and in celebration of today, I’ve decided to release my own inner-poet, in a hilarious attempt at haiku:

 

If you haven’t heard,

Today (August 21)

Celebrates poets!

 

You might be thinking…

Poetry and comics, what?

But bear with me here.

 

Check out Haiku Ewe,

Where sheep write pun-filled haiku,

And ewe wool crack up.

 

Haiku Ewe by Allison Garwood
Haiku Ewe by Allison Garwood

 

Calvin writes poems

That Hobbes never finds funny,

But you surely will.

 

Calvin and Hobbes by Bill Watterson
Calvin and Hobbes by Bill Watterson

 

The daily struggle

Provides much inspiration,

Just look at Luann. 

 

Luann Againn by Greg Evans
Luann Againn by Greg Evans

 

Big Nate loves haiku,

A lot more than Brazil nuts,

But, who doesn’t, right?

 

Big Nate by Lincoln Peirce
Big Nate by Lincoln Peirce

 

Just remember this,

They don’t always have to rhyme.

Sometimes, they shouldn’t …

 

The Duplex by Glenn McCoy
The Duplex by Glenn McCoy

 

Feeling poetic?

Then get to celebrating!

What ‘cha waiting for?

 

 

Happy Poet’s Day, comic fans!

 

– Amanda





COMICS SHERPA: EDITOR'S PICKS

This recurring LAUGH TRACKS feature highlights individual Sherpa strips and panels that for one reason or another caught the fancy of the aide de sherpa. It could be anything; the drawing, the writing, the humor, the coloring, that they tried something interesting, or that it's a new step for that particular creator.

 

We hope this quirky sampler will alert you to features you might not yet have noticed amid Sherpa's abundant, ever-changing, and eclectic mix, and that it gives Sherpa creators a modicum of helpful feedback.

 

 

 Lili and Derek  8-18-15

 

 

 

 

8-18-15

 

 

 

 

Studio Gangstas  8-18-15

 

 

 

Two Bits  8-18-15

 

 

 

 

 

8-19-15

 

 

 

 

8-19-15

 

 

 

 

Magnificatz 8-20-15

 

 

Navy Bean 8-20-15

 

 

 

 

A complete list of all the Sherpa features can be found here. 

 

 

 





Coloring Isn’t Just for Kids!

Betty by Gary Delainey and Gerry Rasmussen
Betty by Gary Delainey and Gerry Rasmussen

 

It may sound childish, but coloring is the latest craze sweeping the nation. With unique, intricate designs geared for adults, coloring is not only fun, it's also relaxing and therapeutic.

 

As Parade Magazine notes, we’ve “ […] caught on to the magical, mood-lifting power of our erstwhile childhood pastime.”

 

Never one to miss out on fun, our friend Janis is ready to give the new trend a try:

 

 

Arlo and Janis by Jimmy Johnson
Arlo and Janis by Jimmy Johnson

 

Arlo and Janis by Jimmy Johnson
Arlo and Janis by Jimmy Johnson

 

 

Not convinced? Lola, the boldest senior citizen around, would never steer you wrong:

 

 

Lola by Todd Clark
Lola by Todd Clark

 

Our sister company, Andrews McMeel Publishing, has a beautiful line of coloring books, proving to be popular with fans!

 

 

Andrews McMeel Publishing Coloring Book   Andrews McMeel Publishing Coloring Book

 

Check out Andrew McMeel Publishing's coloring books here.





GoComics A to Z, Vol. 9: Shutterbug Follies

In this weekly series, editor Lucas Wetzel spotlights new and unusual comic features from the GoComics A-Z listing.

 

Sb

 

Feature: Shutterbug Follies
Creator: Jason Little
Format: single page
Frequency: Mondays and Thursdays
Recommended if you like: graphic novels, thrillers, Ghost World, Charles Burns

 

When I first started reading graphic novels in the mid-aughts, I felt a tingle of excitement similar to when I first dug into art forms like jazz, or documentary films -- exciting new worlds that existed totally outside of my nascent awareness of them. Early additions to my graphic novel shelf included Daniel Clowes' Ghost World, Chris Ware's Jimmy Corrigan, Charles Burns' Black Hole and Alison Bechdel's Fun Home. Right next to those was a lesser-known classic called Shutterbug Follies by a cartoonist named Jason Little.

 

Shutterbug Follies contained a high level of intrigue and suspense (a style he referred to as "bubblegum noir") along with a strong sense of time and place, (New York, fresh out of high school, a time just before digital photography became cheap and ubiquitous). My boss at Universal thought it would make a great feature film, and I agreed. But I also thought its magic fit perfectly into the fish-eye-lens-shaped comic panels that populated the pages of the graphic novel. The bad news is I no longer have a copy, having given it away to a friend several years ago. The good news is the whole thing is online for you and me to read and reread. Where? Where else but GoComics, of course. Check the whole thing out starting here





Curse You, Red Baron!

Here’s the World War I Flying Ace zooming through the air in his Sopwith Camel…

 

Those words began many a Peanuts comic strip, announcing the start of another exciting mission starring Snoopy’s alter ego – The Flying Ace – as he soared across the sky in his Sopwith Camel fighter plane, cursing the Red Baron. With today (August 19) being National Aviation Day, we couldn’t help but think of our favorite comic canine/World War I pilot and reminisce on his many brave adventures:

 

Peanuts by Charles Schulz
Peanuts by Charles Schulz

 

Peanuts by Charles Schulz
Peanuts by Charles Schulz

 

Peanuts by Charles Schulz
Peanuts by Charles Schulz

 

Peanuts by Charles Schulz
Peanuts by Charles Schulz

 

To celebrate National Aviation Day with more of Snoopy’s high-flying adventures and cursing of the Red Baron, view our Peanuts collection, dedicated to The Flying Ace. 





Giveaway: "Stripped" DVDs and Posters

Stripped Poster and DVD

 

We’re just three months away from the 30th anniversary of Calvin and Hobbes! It seems like just yesterday that our adventurous Calvin graced the pages of the newspaper for the first time on Nov. 18, 1985.

 

Bill Watterson influenced many, many cartoonists and the comics industry as a whole through his brilliant comic strip. A love letter to comics, the “Stripped” documentary brings together more than 70 cartoonists to talk about the art form they love, including the first-ever audio interview with Watterson. A supporter of “Stripped,” Watterson designed and painted the accompanying movie poster.

 

We’re feeling both excited and nostalgic with the upcoming anniversary, and we’re giving away TWO “Stripped” DVDs and movie posters.  

 

To enter, browse the Calvin and Hobbes archive here. Then, leave a comment on this blog post with a link to (what you consider to be) the most philosophical Calvin and Hobbes comic strip and include your first and last name. This contest will end Tues., Aug. 25 at 10 a.m. CT. Two winners will be randomly selected and announced that day on this blog.

 





Is it Time for Team Building?

When productivity hits an all-time low …

 

Reply All Lite by Donna A. Lewis
Reply All Lite by Donna A. Lewis

 

 

Motivation has gone out the window …

 

 

The Meaning of Lila by John Forgetta and L.A. Rose
The Meaning of Lila by John Forgetta and L.A. Rose

 

And associates just can’t seem to get along …

 

 

Close to Home by John McPherson
Close to Home by John McPherson

 

 

It’s time to get out of the office!

 

 

Break of Day by Nate Fakes
Break of Day by Nate Fakes

 

What better way to escape than with team-building activities?

 

 

Soup to Nutz by Rick Stromoski
Soup to Nutz by Rick Stromoski

 

After a weekend away …  

 

 

The Buckets by Greg Cravens
The Buckets by Greg Cravens

 

The team is sure to come back stronger than ever. Onward and upward!

 

 

Lucky Cow by Mark Pett

 

 

Not so sure? Savage Chickens has a few tips to help you survive:

 

 

Savage Chickens by Doug Savage
Savage Chickens by Doug Savage

 

Savage Chickens by Doug Savage
Savage Chickens by Doug Savage

 

Savage Chickens by Doug Savage





COMICS SHERPA: EDITOR'S PICKS

This recurring LAUGH TRACKS feature highlights individual Sherpa strips and panels that for one reason or another caught the fancy of the aide de sherpa. It could be anything; the drawing, the writing, the humor, the coloring, that they tried something interesting, or that it's a new step for that particular creator.

 

We hope this quirky sampler will alert you to features you might not yet have noticed amid Sherpa's abundant, ever-changing, and eclectic mix, and that it gives Sherpa creators a modicum of helpful feedback.

 

 

 

8-14-15

 

 

 

No Ordinary Life  8-14-15

 

 

Smith  8-14-15

 

 

 

 

Green Pieces  8-15-15

 

 

 

 

 8-15-15

 

 

 

 

Candace 'n' Company  8-16-15

 

 

 

 

The Green Monkeys  8-16-15

 

 

 

 

And now...  8-17-15

 

 

 

 

Magic Coffee Hair  8-17-15

 

 

 

 

8-17-15

 

A complete list of all the Sherpa features can be found here. 

 

 

 





Weekend Faves (Aug. 17)

 

 

The Argyle Sweater by Scott Hilburn
The Argyle Sweater by Scott Hilburn

 

Autocorrect can be so ducking annoying. – Elizabeth

 

Lola by Todd Clark
Lola by Todd Clark

 

Hounds and hammocks don't mix. – Amanda

 

Holiday Doodles by Missy Meyer
Holiday Doodles by Missy Meyer

 

I've already printed this so that the next time I have a bad day, I can remind myself of the existence of a Madonna bratwurst. MADONNA BRATWURST. – Elizabeth

 

Maria's Day by John Zakour and Scott Roberts
Maria's Day by John Zakour and Scott Roberts

Airborne or not, as someone who can barely get ONE kite off the ground, I find this pretty impressive. – Amanda





Comics For the Mobile Generation

Cell phones have many uses besides placing a phone call or sending a text, acting also as cameras, organizers, game consoles and portals to the all-encompassing Internet. Despite their usefulness, however, they are also capable of deterring our productivity, even posing a threat to our safety if we allow them to.

 

If you don’t believe us, just ask some of our comic characters about the consequences of forgetting to follow proper cell phone protocol:

 

Although they are called “mobile devices,” that does not mean that you should use them while you are in motion. 

 

Luann by Greg Evans
Luann by Greg Evans

 

Multi-tasking is a great skill … just not when the two tasks are “texting” and “driving.”

 

Jeff Stahler by Jeff Stahler
Jeff Stahler by Jeff Stahler

 

Texting while flying: that’s no good, either.

 

Half Full by Maria Scrivan
Half Full by Maria Scrivan

 

Using your phone at a sporting event: Not only do you risk a fly ball to the face, but no one wants to be the schmuck who doesn’t kiss their date on the Kiss Cam.

 

Drabble by Kevin Fagan
Drabble by Kevin Fagan

 

While being on your phone as a spectator is bad, using your phone as a player is worse.

 

FoxTrot by Bill Amend
FoxTrot by Bill Amend

 

Texting on date night: not exactly the epitome of romance.

 

Angry Little Girls by Lela Lee
Angry Little Girls by Lela Lee

 

Savage Chickens by Doug Savage
Savage Chickens by Doug Savage

 

To sum it up, use your phone to capture life’s moments, not keep you from them (unless you want to end up like Fred, here):

 

Pearls Before Swine by Stephan Pastis
Pearls Before Swine by Stephan Pastis




New Comic Alert! Promises, Promises by J.R. Faulkner

Promises, Promises by J.R. Faulkner

Promises, Promises provides a glib look at diet, fitness and the struggles and successes that come with achieving a healthy lifestyle.

 

Promises Fitness is a posh suburban health club. Staffed by Fiona, Trish, Shanta and Lance, four well meaning and cheeky fitness professionals, doing their best to keep a very resistant membership in peak condition.

 

Read Promises, Promises here.





New Comics on GoComics

Enter this week's GoComics giveaway!

Meet Your GoComics Creator: A behind-the-scenes glimpse into the lives of our talented creators.

Twitter Q&As: Chat live on Twitter with our cartoonists Fridays @ 1:30pm CDT





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