COMICS SHERPA: EDITOR'S PICKS

This recurring LAUGH TRACKS feature highlights individual Sherpa strips and panels that for one reason or another caught the fancy of the aide de sherpa. It could be anything; the drawing, the writing, the humor, the coloring, that they tried something interesting, or that it's a new step for that particular creator.


We hope this quirky sampler will alert you to features you might not yet have noticed amid Sherpa's abundant, ever-changing, and eclectic mix, and that it gives Sherpa creators a modicum of helpful feedback.

 

 

 

Leftovers  2-9-16

 


 

 

 


 Oscar and Annie 2-9-16


 

 

 

Spectickles  2-9-16

 


 

 

2-9-16

 


 

 

 

2-9-16

 


 

 

 

The Neville You Know  2-9-16

 


 

 

 

Weasel Ink  2-9-16

 


 

 

 

 

 

2-10-16

 


 

 

 

Girth  2-10-16


 

 

 

Inkwell Forest  2-10-16


 

 

 

Onion & Pea  2-10-16

 


 

 

A complete list of all the Sherpa features can be found here.

 





GoComics A to Z, Vol. 25: WYATT by Eric Gapstur

A weekly feature spotlighting new & unusual features on the GoComics A-Z roster

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Feature: WYATT
Creator: Eric Gapstur
Format: strip
Frequency: M/W/F, alternating Sundays
Recommended if you like: Superhero strips in a domestic setting, Calvin and Hobbes, Frazz, Ink Pen

 

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When I see the modern American family depicted on sitcoms, it's usually so depressing I want to leave the country. The kids always seem so smug, dry and disaffected; hyperstylized puppets for the jaded TV writers scripting their lines. So it's super refreshing to see a comic like WYATT, whose titular character shows an energy and excitement for life, getting into mischief while remaining all the more adorable for it. The premise of the strip is that Wyatt has superpowers, but is too young to use them for anything but extraordinary household feats. Naturally, this leads to all kinds of laughter and chaos.

 

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Wyatt would prefer to be fighting crime, like his police officer father, but his age forces him to be creative when it comes to using his superhuman abilities. It's a neat take on classic comic book tropes, and as an illustrator for DC, Dark Horse and other publishers, Gapstur is the right man for the job. There's even a little Calvin-like pizzazz to the colorful Sunday strips, and as Wyatt becomes more familiar to readers over time, I'm sure his own quirks and characteristics will begin to emerge even more. It also doesn't hurt that Wyatt has an intelligent, witty counterpart in his sister, Adeline.

 

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You can read more WYATT comics several times a week right here on GoComics.





Throwback Thursday: Love Edition

The upcoming Valentine’s Day has us feeling a bit mushy, and Throwback Thursday has us ready for reflection.

 

The result: We’ve decided to take a stroll down memory lane to see how our lovebirds were preparing for the holiday on this very day (Feb. 11) in past years.

 

With so many different personalities, it’s no surprise that we’ve seen everything from cupids to cootie repellents and love woes to love “woos!” Let’s take a look at a few memorable moments:

 

29 years ago ... Charlie Brown and Snoopy awaited adoration from admirers.

 

 

Peanuts by Charles Schulz
Peanuts by Charles Schulz

 

 

19 years ago ... A bite from the love bug left Luann tongue-tied.

 

 

Luann by Greg Evans
Luann by Greg Evans

 

 

16 years ago ... Nate experienced cognitive dissonance.

 

 

Big Nate by Lincoln Peirce
Big Nate by Lincoln Peirce

 

 

9 years ago ... Jon showed off his smooth moves.

 

 

Garfield by Jim Davis
Garfield by Jim Davis

 

 

7 years ago ... Lio snatched victory from the jaws of defeat.

 

 

Lio by Mark Tatulli
Lio by Mark Tatulli

 

 

4 years ago ... Paul found himself in a pickle.

 

 

On A Claire Day by Carla Ventresca and Henry Beckett
On A Claire Day by Carla Ventresca and Henry Beckett

 

 

2 years ago ... Cupid had some fun in the Kingdom of Id.

 

 

Wizard of Id by Parker and Hart
Wizard of Id by Parker and Hart

 

 

1 year ago ... Buni was whisked away.

 

 

Buni by Ryan Pagelow
Buni by Ryan Pagelow

 

More Valentine’s Day-themed comics:

 

Holiday Collection: Valentine’s Day

Peanuts: Love Collection

Calvin and Hobbes: Valentine's Day Collection

Big Nate: Valentine’s Day Collection





Giveaway: Valentine’s Day Bundle

Love is in the air! As a sweet treat this Valentine’s Day, we’ve gathered up a bundle of goodies for one lucky winner!

 

The Valentine’s Day bundle includes:

 

• “Memories” by Lang Leav

• “Soppy” by Philippa Rice

• “Love” by Edward Monkton

• one ORIGINAL, SIGNED Rose is Rose comic strip

 

To enter:

 

a Rafflecopter giveaway

 

 

This contest will end on Feb. 16, 2016 at 12 a.m. CST. We will randomly select one winner and notify the winner via email on Feb. 16, 2016. 

 

The next giveaway will be announced on Feb. 17, 2016 at 6 a.m. CST.





For Better or For Worse: The Comic Art of Lynn Johnston Exhibit

 

 

 

 

Heads up, For Better or For Worse fans! A traveling exhibit, For Better or For Worse: The Comic Art of Lynn Johnston is an incredible exploration of Johnston’s career, influences and history.

 

With a behind-the-scenes look at Johnston’s creative process and life, this exhibition examines the comic throughout its 30-year history, the characters that readers know and love, and fan responses to the comic strip.

 

Did you know Johnston’s For Better or For Worse characters were named after family members and friends? The talented, famed cartoonist shared a bit of insider information about her impressive cartooning career while visiting the exhibit. Take a look:

 

 

 

 

 

Currently on display at Thunder Bay Gallery in Thunder Bay, Ontario, the exhibit moves on to Fredericton, New Brunswick, in June, followed by a stop in North Bay, Ontario, in October. Learn more here.

 

Read For Better or For Worse from the beginning here.





Mark Your Calendars, Peanuts fans!

 

 

If you didn't get the chance to see The Peanuts Movie in theaters, or just can’t get enough, your wait is almost over!

 

The Peanuts Movie will be available for streaming on February 12 on Apple iTunes and Amazon Instant Stream, a significant and meaningful date as it marks the date of Peanuts creator Charles Schulz’ passing 16 years ago.

 

Mark those calendars! (Still need a 2016 calendar? Let us suggest “The Peanuts Movie” wall calendar, or a weekly planner starring Snoopy and friends.)

 

Learn more from The Daily Cartoonist. And, read Peanuts from the beginning here.





Reminder! Last Day to Order Collectible Comic Prints for Valentine’s Day

Collectible Comic Prints

 

 

Heads up! Today (February 9*) is the last day to order an archive-quality comic print for delivery by Valentine’s Day!

 

Don’t miss your chance to make the holiday extra special. Browse available comics here.

 

Done shopping? Get mushy with our Valentine's Day comic collections:

 

Holiday Collection: Valentine's Day

Calvin and Hobbes: Valentine's Day

Big Nate: Valentine's Day

 

 

*Orders must be placed by 11:59 p.m. CST.





5 Mardi Gras Comics to Keep the Good Times Rolling

Laissez les bons temps rouler (or, “Let the good times roll” for you non-French speakers)! Whether you’re in it for the sinfully sweet treats, the bead collection competition, or the extravagant street parades, you can’t deny the allure of Mardi Gras.

 

Eager to take part in today’s festivities, we’re kicking off our Fat Tuesday celebration with beignets, king cake and a gluttonous collection of Mardi-Gras-themed comics:

 

Walt Handelsman by Walt Handelsman
Walt Handelsman by Walt Handelsman

 

The Elderberries by Corey Pandolph and Phil Frank and Joe Troise
The Elderberries by Corey Pandolph and Phil Frank and Joe Troise

 

Pearls Before Swine by Stephan Pastis
Pearls Before Swine by Stephan Pastis

 

Heart of the City by Mark Tatulli
Heart of the City by Mark Tatulli

 

Arlo and Janis by Jimmy Johnson
Arlo and Janis by Jimmy Johnson

 

The party’s not over yet! Indulge in more funnies – dance your way over to our Mardi Gras collection.

 





COMICS SHERPA: EDITOR'S PICKS

This recurring LAUGH TRACKS feature highlights individual Sherpa strips and panels that for one reason or another caught the fancy of the aide de sherpa. It could be anything; the drawing, the writing, the humor, the coloring, that they tried something interesting, or that it's a new step for that particular creator.


We hope this quirky sampler will alert you to features you might not yet have noticed amid Sherpa's abundant, ever-changing, and eclectic mix, and that it gives Sherpa creators a modicum of helpful feedback.

 

 

 Buns  2-5-16

 

 

 

Cleo and Compay  2-5-16

 

 

 

 

 

Econogirl  2-5-16

 

 

 

No Ambiguity  2-5-16

 

 

 

 

 

2-6-16

 

 

 

 

Zombie Heights  2-6-16

 

 

 

 

Batch Rejection  2-7-16

 

 

 

 

2-7-16

 

 

 

 

2-7-16

 

 

 

 

Skull  2-7-16

 

 

 

 

A complete list of all the Sherpa features can be found here.

 

 





A Salute to Big Nate and Boy Scouts Everywhere

Hard-working, courageous, responsible, respectful – those are just a few of the qualities you’d expect to find in your friendly neighborhood boy scout. A program teaching important life skills and values, scouting has had a profound impact on the lives of many young men across America, from presidents to astronauts – even GoComics’ very own Nate Wright.

 

In honor of today (February 8) being National Boy Scout Day, we’re celebrating Big Nate and the other dedicated members of Timber Scout Troop #3! For the past 25 years of Lincoln Peirce’s classic comic strip, they’ve sold everything from cookies to calendars, braved the elements on countless campouts and earned merit badges for just about anything you could think of:

 

Big Nate by Lincoln Peirce
Big Nate by Lincoln Peirce

 

Big Nate by Lincoln Peirce
Big Nate by Lincoln Peirce

 

Big Nate by Lincoln Peirce
Big Nate by Lincoln Peirce

 

We proudly award Big Nate the merit badge for endless entertainment!

 

For more Timber Scout adventures, view our full collection.





4 Places to Eat While Chipotle is Closed

Today (Feb. 8), Chipotle stores across the globe are closing their doors for a short time as the company addresses food safety concerns plaguing the beloved chain.

 

That’s right, folks, don't plan on ordering your go-to steak burrito with double black beans and hot salsa for lunch today. Bummer, huh?

 

We’re here to help!

 

Before the burritoless day leaves your stomach grumbling, let us recommend a few delectable alternative eateries:

 

1. Lucky CowAmerican staples served with a side of honesty.

 

 

Lucky Cow by Mark Pett
Lucky Cow by Mark Pett

 

 

2. The La Cucaracha Taco Cart – Why wait until Taco Tuesday?

 

 

La Cucaracha by Lalo Alcaraz
La Cucaracha by Lalo Alcaraz


 

3. Your local coffee shop – Fight the lunch-induced afternoon slump with a double-shot of espresso.

 

 

Beardo by Dan Dougherty
Beardo by Dan Dougherty

 

 

4. Pooch Café – But ... only if you don’t mind toilet water.

 

 

Pooch Cafe by Paul Gilligan
Pooch Cafe by Paul Gilligan

 

 





Kick Off Super Bowl 50 with Our Football-Themed Funnies

Huddle up, comic fans!

 

Super Bowl Sunday is finally here, and we’ve got the perfect way to get you pumped up for game time. After scouring the GoComics Hall of Fame, we’ve put together a winning playbook of Super Bowl humor to help you cheer your team to victory (or, just kill time until the commercials start):

 

Drabble by Kevin Fagan
Drabble by Kevin Fagan

 

FoxTrot by Bill Amend
FoxTrot by Bill Amend

 

Dogs of C-Kennel by Mick & Mason Mastroianni
Dogs of C-Kennel by Mick & Mason Mastroianni

 

Want more football funnies? Catch the rest of our Super Bowl comics, here.

 





Meet Your Creator: Carol Lay (Lay Lines)

Meet Your Creator on GoComics

 

The GoComics “Meet Your Creator” series brings you firsthand insight into the lives and careers of your favorite cartoonists. Each week, we hand over the keys to one of our talented creators, who share their inspirations, achievements, creative processes, studios and more! Read on to hear from this week’s featured cartoonist: Carol Lay of Lay Lines

 

How to Build a Cartoonist

 

 

Carol Lay
Carol in the desert.

 

 

My mother doomed me to be an artist when she praised a drawing I did when I was maybe 3 or 4. My good parents also sent me to extracurricular art classes and, later, to UCLA where I learned how to paint and draw naked ladies, but not how to make an actual living at it. My first non-waitressing job after college was drawing trucks and carpet cleaning guys for Yellow Page ads, which taught me how to use a dolly, carve Rubylith, and operate a stat camera (ask your grandpa).

 

But, back to when I was small. Influences were plentiful: “The Twilight Zone” and “Alfred Hitchcock Presents” came out fresh each week on the black and white Zenith. I also devoured Warner Bros. and Fleischer cartoons, Disney films, newspaper strips and lots of books at the library. Oddly, I didn’t read many comic books as a kid – I didn’t chance upon the good stuff, and I picked up comics that didn’t really do it for me. Little Dot instead of Little Lulu. Casper instead of Barks’ Ducks. I really missed the boat. The final blow came when I read a Classics Illustrated version of The Oxbow Incident. It was someone’s terrible idea to inflict that on kids. I mean, really. I didn’t pick up another comic book until I was in college and my boyfriend showed me Zap Comix. Mind blown, but I still had no idea I would turn into a cartoonist as I was studying to be a Fine Artist, ha ha.

 

 

 

Carol Lay
An illustration for The Wall Street Journal

 

 

During my junior year, I took one class too many in Conceptual Art. At first, I was fascinated. I sought out audiences with artists John Baldessari and Chris Burden, trying to fathom the Fine Art scene. One of the best pieces I did involved hooking the class into finding out what happened to an object, a storytelling device. I wouldn’t realize until later that that is what was missing for me in Fine Art: story. Finally, one instructor was so full of nonsense, I suddenly stopped wanting to be an artist. It felt like having a broken heart. I quit drawing for two years and almost switched my major to Computer Science. In an alternate world, I am married to a charming geek with a nice home in San Francisco or San Jose, bored out of my mind and seeing a shrink five times a week. (That version of me can afford it.) Mom came to the rescue by asking me to draw some number cards for her first-grade class. I made some clever, funny-looking cartoons and re-discovered art, but in a pragmatic, non-pretentious mode, rejecting adult notions of art and circling back to the childlike fun stuff. Meanwhile, after flirting with the idea of becoming an SF/fantasy illustrator, a friend gave me a crash course in comics history. Before long I met a gaggle of cartoonists and writers at a small comics convention. One of them hired me to letter some pages for an underground comic, so I used skills I’d picked up along the way to do that, which snowballed into more and better lettering jobs, mostly through Roy Thomas on Marvel Comics.

 

The first Marvel page I was assigned to letter terrified me. It may have been a Buscema Tarzan – artful, professional and intimidating. What if I spilled ink on the page? But … I did an acceptable job. Roy gave me more work, and I got better at it. Having penciled originals in hand gave me the opportunity to trace them off and teach myself to ink. I absorbed composition, storytelling skills and more by lettering pages drawn by excellent artists. I also learned from good and poor writers the pacing of dialog and captions, and the pitfalls of overwriting.               

 

Over the next couple of decades, I did a lot of commercial art (Mattel, ad illustrations, T-shirt designs, etc.), storyboards or art for rock videos, animation, commercials and live-action films (“Top Secret,” “Back to the Beach,” DEVO, Def Leppard), and more inking or art for mainstream comics. I even airbrushed a pill turning into a roast chicken for the SF camp film, “Galaxina” (yes, I have screen credit) and rotoscoped some light saber action for “The Empire Strikes Back.”

 

 

Carol Lay
A storyboard page for an animated show, The Zula Patrol.

 

 

My main love was comics, though – my own. I wrote and drew stories for undergrounds, which were morphing into “independent” publishers: Rip Off Press, Last Gasp and Kitchen Sink Press, among others. Good Girls 1-6 started with Fantagraphics as a sort of variety show, but turned into Irene Van de Kamp’s story, a send-up of adventure and romance comics. The lovely and talented Ron Turner of Last Gasp published the collected Irene stories, for which I tackled Devo’s Mark Mothersbaugh to write the introduction.

 

Mark Evanier is one of those people I met at the small convention back in the Stone Age. He spotted potential in my amateur efforts and was a big help in letting me earn while I learned on Hanna-Barbera comics, writing and drawing. He also showed me how to do storyboards so I could get work in animation, introduced me to Del Connell at Western Publishing when I was ready to ink ducks ‘n’ stuff and more. Thanks, Mark!

 

An aside about cartoon formats and some of the greats

 

I’ve sold a few single-panel gag cartoons, but this is a specialized and minimalistic form of cartooning. Aside from a few syndicated cartoonists, dedicated artists submit dozens or hundreds of gags for every printed success. I don’t have that kind of mental stamina, nor the thick skin needed for countless rejections. My all-time favorites are Charles Addams, William Steig and Saul Steinberg. Of the current crop, I often find Roz Chast and Edward Steed funny.

 

When I was young I read all the daily strips in the L.A. Times and more in the evening Orange County Register. It’s telling that I can’t recall what ran in the Register, but the Times ran Dick Tracy, Li’l Abner, Nancy, Emmy Lou, Apartment 3G, Brenda Starr, Peanuts, Rick O’Shay, Mary Worth, B.C., Wizard of Id, Big George and more. Even though Al Capp’s work took a bad turn in the late ’60s, I loved Dogpatch, Shmoos, Kickapoo Joy Juice and Fearless Fosdick. Rick O’Shay had likeable characters, and great art. Brenda Starr confused me because I was too young to figure out Hank. Dick Tracy got weird with trips to the moon, but I read it anyway. Overall, I became invested in the serials, which now seem to be almost an endangered species. Later I discovered my all-time favorite dailies, Herriman’s Krazy Kat and Segar’s Thimble TheaterCalvin and Hobbes got my attention and admiration, then disappeared. Today, I read Doonesbury and Endtown.

 

 

Segar
Segar hits the nail on the head.

 

 

Comic books come in many flavors: funny animals, kids, capes, adult, realistic, fantasy, silly and serious. There are good and awful works in all categories, I suppose. Influences include ZAP, early MAD (Don Martin especially), Carl Bark’s duck comics (which I didn’t read until after college) and undergrounds. I got a lot out of Robert Crumb’s work, and loved Rick Griffin’s pantomime eye candy. I also enjoy works by Carol Tyler, Aline Kominsky-Crumb, and the Hernandez brothers, among others.

 

Graphic novels. Comic stories in long form, these involve a tremendous amount of work and planning for often very little reward. I love anything by Kim Deitch. I admit I haven’t read many GNs – a couple written by Alan Moore, the excellent The Carter Family by Frank M. Young and David Lasky, Blankets, and I picked up Pinocchio by Winshluss but have yet to get to the end. (I’m easily distracted.) Marian Henley’s The Shiniest Jewel will make you laugh and cry, and I see why Persepolis was turned into an animated film.

 

L.A. and NYC

 

So, there I was in East Hollywood during my young adult years doing art as a day job, comics on the side, and wishing I could do comics full time. I tried pitching a daily strip two or three times, but my brain doesn’t go to that format by choice. I love comic book-length stories, but the opportunities for doing that kind of work are slim if you’re not into superheroes.

 

In the early ’90s, I started my weekly strip and was also doing illustrations for New York-based magazines like Entertainment Weekly. At the same time, I was also doing storyboards on an unlikely animated show starring talking cattle dressed as cowboys that rode horses that didn’t talk. That job started an inner revolt in me – I didn’t want to make good money working on bad stuff.

 

 

Carol Lay
An illustration for “What if Women Ran Hollywood?” Entertainment Weekly.

 

 

An acquaintance offered to sublet his Brooklyn apartment to me for a magically low rate, so I left animation and moved to New York. All I had to do was pay the rent on time and keep his porn safe. It was a good move. Before long, I was getting more illustration work. My strip picked up more papers, including The NY Press and The San Francisco Examiner, and I met a lot of great cartoonists in the city – Jules Feiffer, Art Spiegelman, Sam Gross and Arnold Roth, to name-drop a few. I got semi-steady gigs drawing illustrations and strips for The Wall Street Journal and Worth Magazine. I got to do eight or nine comics-journalism pieces for The New Yorker. More papers picked up my weekly strip, which morphed from serials into Story Minute. I married a smart and funny man and, a few years later, we moved back to L.A.

 

 

 

Carol Lay 2
Watercolor on illustration board for The New Yorker Magazine.

 

 

When alternative weeklies started tanking, cartoons were among the first features to get the ax, so I wrote a prose novel starring Wonder Woman for DC/Pocketbooks, and a cartoon diet book for Random House, “The Big Skinny,” of which I’m still proud.

 

Several years ago, Bongo Comics contacted me to write and draw stories for Bart Simpson and The Simpsons Comics. After many years of doing one-page stories for my strip, it was great to stretch out with 12 or 22 pages – the longer, the better.

 

 

 

Play It Forward
Reprinted with permission from Simpsons Comics #170 © 2016 Bongo Entertainment, Inc.
The Simpsons TM & © Twentieth Century Fox Film Corporation. All Rights Reserved.

 

 

But as much as I love writing stories for Lisa, Marge, and Homer, they aren’t mine. Circumstances steered me away from that cozy gig and back to doing my own thing again.

 

Fast forward to present. I am having a great time coming up with new Murderville stories for GoComics. Everything I’ve done in the past informs what I’m doing now. I had to learn a new format, so I studied how Aaron Neathery pulls off his comic adventure stories in Endtown, although my style is more influenced by comic book form in that I write definite beginnings, middles and ends.

 

 

Carol Lay 3
A page from Knit One, my first all-digital comic story, new for GoComics.

 

(If you have yet to try a Murderville, here are some starting points):

 

• “Knit One” – August 9, 2015

• “The One that Got Away” – June 30, 2015

• “A Farewell to Armories” – Oct. 18, 2015

• “Art Attack” – Nov. 29, 2015

 

A big change came in the summer of 2015 when I bought Manga Studio 5 and a 13” Cintiq drawing tablet. I never would have guessed I’d put away ink and paper, but it turns out drawing this way is so much FUN. MS5 has some similarities to Photoshop (on which I still rely for coloring), but it has vector drawing tricks that fit the angular cartoony style of my Murderville inhabitants. It saves me all kinds of time, and Look, Ma – no scanning. LOVE it! The only downside is having no originals to sell, but I still have plenty of art the silverfish overlooked.

 

 

Carol Lay
I neglect my old drawing table in favor of the sleek Cintiq.

 

 

I recently did a commission, the first time I’d used ink and brush on paper in several months. That fear I experienced when I got my first Marvel lettering job came back. What if I spilled ink on it, or messed up that eyeball? There’s no undo button on paper. (P.S.: Everything turned out fine.)

 

Odds and Endings

 

As I write this, one of my two elderly cats is curled up on my lap, ready to hiss if I try to cross my legs. I love dogs, too, but these guys won’t have it.

 

I like quiet when I write or do thumbnails to plan pages, but I get to listen to audiobooks or stream TV shows or movies when I draw.

 

Several years ago I felt the need to learn something new, so I started playing English concertina. Traditional Irish and Scottish music makes sense to me on some ancestral level, so I practice and play, hopefully daily. It’s a good meditation and I’ve noticed that my writing becomes more fluent as I get better. Hmm.

 

Two favorite films: Tarsem’s “The Fall” and Guillermo del Toro’s Pan’s “Labyrinth.”

 

If I could pick anyone to hang out with for a day: Neil deGrasse Tyson.

 

I grew up with horses in the backyard, and I miss that connection to large animals. I also used to scuba dive in beautiful Cozumel or exotic places like Yap and Palau, but I need a new dive buddy. If you have a spare horse, or a boat with an extra tank, drop me a line!

 

Read Lay Lines here.





ICYMI: Twitter Q&A with Brian Gordon (Fowl Language)

Fowl Language by Brian Gordon

 

We’d like to thank Brian Gordon for joining us on Twitter to talk about his hit new comic, Fowl Language! If you couldn’t tune in for today’s Twitter Q&A, catch up hereor use the widget below:

 

 

Subscribe to Fowl Language!

 

 





6 Times Doodling Went Too Far

Do you find yourself doodling your way through every meeting?

 

Be careful. As we’ve learned through the years, a doodling habit may start out innocently but can quickly get out of hand.

 

Straying far from the hearts and stars found in a teenage girl’s notebook, these 6 doodlers have taken their designs to the next level, landing them in hot water!

 

1. Frazz:

 

 

Frazz by Jef Mallett
Frazz by Jef Mallett

 

 

2. Nate:

 

 

Big Nate by Lincoln Peirce
Big Nate by Lincoln Peirce

 

 

3. Thatababy:

 

 

Thatababy by Paul Trap
Thatababy by Paul Trap

 

 

4. Calvin:

 

 

Calvin and Hobbes by Bill Watterson
Calvin and Hobbes by Bill Watterson

 

 

5. Wilberforce:

 

 

The Born Loser by Art and Chip Sansom
The Born Loser by Art and Chip Sansom

 

 

6. Lola:

 

 

Lola by Todd Clark
Lola by Todd Clark


 

 

P.S. Today (Feb. 5) is Doodle Day! Can't get enough doodles? Follow Doodle Town for an illustrated glimpse of Melissa Lomax’s journal.





COMICS SHERPA: EDITOR'S PICKS

This recurring LAUGH TRACKS feature highlights individual Sherpa strips and panels that for one reason or another caught the fancy of the aide de sherpa. It could be anything; the drawing, the writing, the humor, the coloring, that they tried something interesting, or that it's a new step for that particular creator.


We hope this quirky sampler will alert you to features you might not yet have noticed amid Sherpa's abundant, ever-changing, and eclectic mix, and that it gives Sherpa creators a modicum of helpful feedback.

 

 

 

2-3-16

 

 

 

 

2-3-16

 

 

 

 

It's Just Jim  2-3-16

 

 

 

 

QuickDraw  2-3-16

 

 

 

 

Signs of a Frustrated Golfer  2-3-16

 

 

 

 

the Gray Zone  2-3-16

 

 

 

 

2-4-16

 

 

Green Pieces  2-4-16

 

 

 

Magnificatz  2-4-16

 

 

 

Prideland  2-4-16

 

 

 

 

 

A complete list of all the Sherpa features can be found here.

 





Tank McNamara's Sports Jerk of the Year Award: Last Day to Nominate!

Tank McNamara by Bill Hinds

 

 

Calling all sports fans! Today (February 4) is the VERY LAST day to nominate a contestant for the 2015 Tank McNamara “Sports Jerk of the Year” Award!

 

Who committed the biggest fumble, foul or fault in the 2015 sports arena? We want to hear from you! Find nomination instructions here.

 

Wondering who your fellow fans have nominated? Find out in the video below! Watch carefully – you'll see a guest appearance from Stone Soup cartoonist Jan Eliot!

 

 

 

 





Giveaway: 2016 Peanuts Wall Calendars

It was incredible to see Charlie Brown and the gang hit the big screen last October in the super-fun 3-D animated movie!

 

We’re giving away FIVE “The Peanuts Movie” 2016 wall calendars for those of you who, like us, just can’t get enough of this modern, yet respectful, take on Schulz’ masterpiece.

 

To enter:

 

a Rafflecopter giveaway

 

This contest will end on Feb. 9, 2016 at 12 a.m. CST. We will randomly select five winners and notify the winners via email on Feb. 9, 2016.

 

The next giveaway will be announced on Feb. 10, 2016 at 6 a.m. CST.

 

Read Peanuts daily on GoComics!





Get a JumpStart on Black History Month

Sunny and Jojo star in Robb Armstrong’s family comic, JumpStart. Witty and wise beyond their years, the brother-sister duo brings a refreshing dose of humor and heart to readers, reminding us how much we can learn from today’s youth.

 

One of our favorite themes from JumpStart occurs every year during this time. With February being Black History Month, Sunny and Jojo are assigned their annual Black History report.

 

JumpStart by Robb Armstrong
JumpStart by Robb Armstrong

 

For this project, they research some of the most influential African-American people in history, and their passion for finding out more about these American heroes is inspiring.

 

JumpStart by Robb Armstrong
JumpStart by Robb Armstrong

 

From those you’ve probably heard of:

 

JumpStart by Robb Armstrong
JumpStart by Robb Armstrong

 

JumpStart by Robb Armstrong
JumpStart by Robb Armstrong

 

To some you might be less familiar with:

 

JumpStart by Robb Armstrong
JumpStart by Robb Armstrong

 

You’d be surprised how much you can learn from these two young scholars.

 

JumpStart by Robb Armstrong
JumpStart by Robb Armstrong

 





Giveaway: Coloring Prize Pack – Winner Announced

Posh Coloring from Andrews McMeel Publishing

 

Thank you to all who entered to win our "Coloring Prize Pack"!

 

Congratulations to Cathy Boucher! You've won:

 

• Posh: Coloring 2016 Day-to-Day Calendar
• Posh Adult Coloring Book: Japanese Designs for Fun and Relaxation
• Posh Adult Coloring Book: Soothing Designs for Fun and Relaxation

 

Cathy, please contact us at rewards@gocomics.com with your shipping address and phone number. Please note: You must contact us by 2/9/16 or your prize will be forfeited.

 

 

Not a winner? Purchase:

 

• Coloring 2016 Day-to-Day Calendar here
• Japanese Designs for Fun and Relaxation here
• Soothing Designs for Fun and Relaxation here

 

Stay tuned! The next giveaway will be announced on 2/3/16 at 6 a.m. CT.





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