Nick Galifianakis Presents “The Art of Richard Thompson” at GoComics HQ

Nick Galifianakis

 

 

Nick Galifianakis, creator of Nick and Zuzu and longtime illustrator of the Carolyn Hax advice column in The Washington Post, stopped by the GoComics offices yesterday!

 

Galifianakis presented “The Art of Richard Thompson,” a multimedia retrospective on the life and art of Cul de Sac and Richard’s Poor Almanac creator Richard Thompson. In 2014, Galifianakis joined forces with David Apatoff, Chris Sparks and Calvin and Hobbes creator Bill Watterson to put together a book of the same name, highlighting the impressive breadth and scope of Thompson’s work throughout his career.

 

Galifianakis also contributed to “Team Cul de Sac: Cartoonists Draw the Line at Parkinson’s,” a collection of art donated by dozens of cartoonists and edited by Chris Sparks. A portion of the profits from “Team Cul de Sac” benefit Parkinson’s research. Richard Thompson was diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease in 2009.

 

Galifianakis’s presentation offered unique insight into the life, oeuvre and creative development of Richard Thompson. Through moving anecdotes, Galifianakis shared how Thompson has been both a source of inspiration throughout their long friendship and a visionary in the field of illustration. Thompson’s genius, long recognized by his peers, is now receiving even greater attention thanks to Galifianakis and "The Art of Richard Thompson."

 

Thanks for an awesome presentation, Nick!





COMICS SHERPA: EDITOR'S PICKS

This recurring LAUGH TRACKS feature highlights individual Sherpa strips and panels that for one reason or another caught the fancy of the aide de sherpa. It could be anything; the drawing, the writing, the humor, the coloring, that they tried something interesting, or that it's a new step for that particular creator.


We hope this quirky sampler will alert you to features you might not yet have noticed amid Sherpa's abundant, ever-changing, and eclectic mix, and that it gives Sherpa creators a modicum of helpful feedback.

 

 

 

4-26-16

 

 

The Magic Forest 4-26-16

 

 

 

 

Candace 'n' Company  4-27-16

 

 

 

 

Courageous Man Adventures  4-27-16

 

 

 

 

Famous and Not-So-Famous Quotes  4-27-16

 

 

 

 

4-28-16

 

 

 

4-28-16

 

 

 

 

Whiteouts  4-28-16

 

 

 

A complete list of all the Sherpa features can be found here.

 





Happy Cubicle Day, Office Drones!

Right now, millions of office employees are hunched over their keyboards, bathed in fluorescent light, counting down the hours until they can go home.

 

Today, Cubicle Day, is a celebration of those hardworking, overly air-conditioned employees. We want to show our appreciation with a giveaway featuring everyone’s favorite cubicle-dweller: Dilbert!

 

One lucky winner will receive a collectible, archive-quality Dilbert print of their choosing! To enter, select your favorite strip from the Dilbert archives and share in the comments section of the giveaway post by 10 a.m. CT on Friday, April 29.



Click here to browse the Dilbert archive!


Happy Cubicle Day, and good luck!





Celebrate Mother’s Day With Collectible Comic Prints!

image from https://s3.amazonaws.com/feather-client-files-aviary-prod-us-east-1/2016-04-27/7bdb1e05ee724d7aadbfb7758a5422f6.png

 

With Mother’s Day quickly approaching, you’re probably searching for that perfect gift to let her know how much she means to you.


This year, get her something she’ll treasure forever: an archive-quality, collectible print of her favorite comic strip!

 

image from https://s3.amazonaws.com/feather-client-files-aviary-prod-us-east-1/2016-04-27/8747b1a1d81c42a5b1fc66805227b033.png

 

Choose from thousands of comics ranging from classics such as Peanuts to popular newcomers such as Phoebe and Her Unicorn and hit webcomics like The Awkward Yeti and Breaking Cat News!

 

The comic you choose will be printed on high-quality 11”x17” paper. Unframed collectible prints are available for $39.95. Framed collectible prints start at  $229.95. Browse available comic prints here.


If you’re feeling lucky, we’re also giving away a collectible Cathy print and a copy of the brand-new collection “The Mother-Daughter Dance” by Cathy Guisewite! Enter our Mother’s Day giveaway here!





GIVEAWAY: Mother’s Day Prize Pack

Mother’s Day falls on May 8 this year, which means you have a little more than two weeks to find that perfect gift. Don’t stress — we’ve got you covered!

 

We’re giving away a prize pack featuring one of our favorite mother-daughter duos: Cathy and her mother, Anne! One lucky winner will receive a collectible, archive-quality Cathy print and a copy of "The Mother-Daughter Dance" by Cathy Guisewite.

 

a Rafflecopter giveaway

 

This contest will end on May 3, 2016, at 12 a.m. CT. We will randomly select one winner and notify the winner via email on May 3, 2016.

 

Can't wait to see if you win? Click here to buy "The Mother-Daughter Dance."

 

For more of Cathy and her mom's adventures, click here!

 

The next giveaway will be announced on May 4, 2016 at 6 a.m. CT.





Happy National Inventors Month!

From the wheel to sliced bread, human ingenuity at times seems limitless. Inventors and other daring dreamers are responsible for society’s advancement, so it makes sense we honor them during National Inventors Month!

 

They say necessity is the mother of invention. Below, we’ve assembled a list of five reasons to invent something, brought to you by your our resident inventors:


1.To achieve fame and fortune

Big Nate by Lincoln Peirce
Big Nate by Lincoln Peirce



2. To make dirty jobs more tolerable

 

Real Life Adventures by Gary Wise and Lance Aldrich
Real Life Adventures by Gary Wise and Lance Aldrich



3. To retire rich

 

Soup to Nutz by Rick Stromoski
Soup to Nutz by Rick Stromoski



4. To solve a very specific problem

 

Adam@Home by Rob Harrell
Adam@Home by Rob Harrell



5. To avoid something unpleasant

 

Calvin and Hobbes by Bill Watterson
Calvin and Hobbes by Bill Watterson



Whatever your reason, channel your inner inventor and find something in your life that needs fixing!


Happy National Inventors Month!

 





COMICS SHERPA: EDITOR'S PICKS

This recurring LAUGH TRACKS feature highlights individual Sherpa strips and panels that for one reason or another caught the fancy of the aide de sherpa. It could be anything; the drawing, the writing, the humor, the coloring, that they tried something interesting, or that it's a new step for that particular creator.


We hope this quirky sampler will alert you to features you might not yet have noticed amid Sherpa's abundant, ever-changing, and eclectic mix, and that it gives Sherpa creators a modicum of helpful feedback.

 

 

 

Amanda the Great  4-23-16

 

 

 

 

Dysconnected 4-23-16

 

 

 

 

Inkwell Forest  4-23-16

 

 

 

 

Soccer Earth  4-25-16

 

 

 

The Boobiehatch  4-25-16

 

 

 

A complete list of all the Sherpa features can be found here.

 





New Comic Alert! Magnificatz by Steve Ogden

Magnificatz by Steve Ogden
Magnificatz by Steve Ogden

 

Sam and Nina are two cats as different as the right and left sides of your brain. Where Sam is creative, enthusiastic and optimistic, Nina is logical, critical and cynical. They live, laugh and argue in a fever-dream land of imagination.

In addition to general silliness, Sam and Nina debate the creative process, the role of art and science, and just who ate that last can of tuna. Together, these two cats are… Magnificatz!

 

Read Magnificatz here!





Sunday Punday!

Pearls Before Swine by Stephan Pastis

 

Whether you’re new to the funnies or a seasoned comics reader, you’ve almost certainly noticed that many comics have one thing in common: puns!


The comic art form lends itself easily to the pithy wordplay of puns. We’ve gathered a few truly punny examples for you to enjoy:

 

Dark Side of the Horse by Samson
Dark Side of the Horse by Samson

 

 

Four Eyes by Gemma Correll
Four Eyes by Gemma Correll

 

 

Looks Good on Paper by Dan Collins
Looks Good on Paper by Dan Collins

 

 

Half Full by Maria Scrivan
Half Full by Maria Scrivan

 

 

The Flying McCoys by Glenn McCoy and Gary McCoy
The Flying McCoys by Glenn McCoy and Gary McCoy

 

 

Wrong Hands by John Atkinson
Wrong Hands by John Atkinson

 

 

Play on, words!





Meet Your Creator: Corey Pandolph (Barkeater Lake, The Elderberries, TOBY)

MYC_blog_header

 

 

The GoComics “Meet Your Creator” series brings you firsthand insight into the lives and careers of your favorite cartoonists. Each week, we hand over the keys to one of our talented creators, who share their inspirations, achievements, creative processes, studios and more! Read on to hear from this week’s featured cartoonist: Corey Pandolph of Barkeater Lake, The Elderberries and TOBY.

 

 

Toby by Corey Pandolph
Toby by Corey Pandolph

 

 

How did you begin your career as a cartoonist? When did you start cartooning?

 

All I cared about as a kid was cartoons. I read comic books, watched cartoons on TV and read the Sunday funnies cover to cover. As I grew up, my career aspirations swayed some, but always came back to drawing comics and cartoons.

 

As an adult, I would bartend and wait tables at night so I could concentrate on comic ideas during the day. I spent years sending away submissions to the major syndicates and even tried to break into comic books at one point. In 2000, I hooked a development deal with United Media and have been full time at cartooning and illustration in one form or another since.

 

 

What inspires you?

 

 

 

The New Yorker

 

 

People watching, mostly. And the jumbled architecture of New York City. There's so much going on at one point or another here that an hour of drawing people and buildings in the park can inspire a file cabinet of ideas. The brick, concrete, water towers, twisted wires peppered with trees and people going to work, riding bikes, falling down, being gross, being mean, being nice -- it's a giant reference photo. After overloading on the sights and (ugh) smells, I bring it all back to my desk and try and twist my brain into a fresh perspective. That's where the jokes come from -- making the things most people take for granted into an original (hopefully funny) thought. And the voices. Lots of jokes come from the voices. But we'll pretend I didn't say that.

 

 

The Elderberries by Corey Pandolph
The Elderberries by Corey Pandolph, Phil Frank and Joe Troise

 

 

Another great inspiration tool is working in unfamiliar styles or media just for fun. I like to use watercolor, oils and sometimes spray paint to see what I can accomplish. I also play a decent blues guitar, which keeps me creative, but separates me enough from my actual job, to be helpful.

 

 

What are some of your biggest achievements or accomplishments?

 

 

Cul de Sac
Cul de Sac

 

 

Besides being syndicated in newspapers with The Elderberries, I'd say my two greatest achievements are getting to write and draw Richard Thompson's Cul de Sac for a week and being a regular in The New Yorker magazine. Oh, and MAD. I got to draw their take on what the final Cathy strips would be. That was fun. And hard. I also once built shelves for the actor Michael O'Keefe. In Brooklyn.

 

My life is weird.

 

 

What were your favorite childhood comics? What comics do you read today?

 

I read all the Peanuts I could. Read Garfield when I was young. Held onto Calvin and Hobbes books like they were the bible and got into Krazy Kat and the art of Peter Arno later on. I'm into a lot of comic books and superhero stuff these days. I still feel like I'm learning how to draw, so I take the occasional life drawing course when I can.

 

 

Do you have any upcoming projects or appearances?

 

Corey Pandolph

I'm currently trying to write my first crime novel and diving into some graphic novel ideas. It's a mess at the moment, but it's a beautiful mess. I like to write and always feel like I don't do enough of it. I do some appearances that are part of being a New Yorker cartoonist, but I tend to steer clear of a lot public appearances that don't occur with my friends at a pub.

 

 

Tell us about your studio or workspace.

 

 

Corey Pandolph Studio

 

 

We live in a studio apartment in Manhattan, so I really just have a desk in the corner. It's cozy and my commute is 10 feet, so life could be worse.

 

• Find TOBY here.

• Read Barkeater Lake here.

• Check out The Elderberries here.





Celebrate Earth Day with Green Humour!

Every year on April 22, we celebrate Earth Day — a day when the world comes together to address global environmental issues such as climate change and deforestation.

 

Green Humour by Rohan Chakravarty
Green Humour by Rohan Chakravarty

 

 

For Rohan Chakravarty, creator of Green Humour, every day is Earth Day! Chakravarty uses his bi-weekly comic to educate readers through informational yet humorous strips.

 

Green Humour by Rohan Chakravarty
Green Humour by Rohan Chakravarty

 

 

If you like laughing and are interested in learning more about the environment, endangered species and a host of other topics, enjoy more Green Humour on GoComics!


Want more Earth Day-themed comics? Check out our collection here!





COMICS SHERPA: EDITOR'S PICKS

This recurring LAUGH TRACKS feature highlights individual Sherpa strips and panels that for one reason or another caught the fancy of the aide de sherpa. It could be anything; the drawing, the writing, the humor, the coloring, that they tried something interesting, or that it's a new step for that particular creator.


We hope this quirky sampler will alert you to features you might not yet have noticed amid Sherpa's abundant, ever-changing, and eclectic mix, and that it gives Sherpa creators a modicum of helpful feedback.

 

 

 

4-19-16

 

 

 

 

No Ordinary Life  4-19-16

 

 

 

 

Stale Crackers 4-19-16

 

People of Earth  4-20-16

 

 

 

 

Spectickles  4-20-16

 

 

Dysconnected  4-21-16

 

 

 

 

Green Pieces  4-21-16

 

 

 

A complete list of all the Sherpa features can be found here.

 





What Rhymes With “National Poetry Month”?

Attention all sonnet savants, limerick legends and couplet connoisseurs: April is National Poetry Month!

 

If you think poetry has no place within the panels of daily comics, you’re mistaken. Rhymes and verses appear frequently in comics, proving that in addition to being illustrious illustrators, cartoonists can be talented wordsmiths as well.


In honor of National Poetry Month, we’ve assembled an assortment of poems from our favorite comics below.

 

 

Luann by Greg Evans
Luann by Greg Evans

 

 

Heart of the City by Mark Tatulli
Heart of the City by Mark Tatulli

 

 

Calvin and Hobbes by Bill Watterson
Calvin and Hobbes by Bill Watterson

 

 

Lola by Todd Clark
Lola by Todd Clark

 

 

Maintaining by Nate Creekmore
Maintaining by Nate Creekmore

 

 

Big Nate by Lincoln Peirce
Big Nate by Lincoln Peirce

 

For more of Nate’s poetry, check out our collection here!



Happy National Poetry Month!





GIVEAWAY: F Minus 10th Anniversary Prize Pack

On April 17, 2006, F Minus made its national newspaper debut. Ten years later, creator Tony Carrillo continues to amuse and entertain the masses with new F Minus strips appearing every day.

 

To celebrate a decade of F Minus, we’re giving away an anniversary prize pack, including a collectible, archive-quality print and a copy of “This Can’t Be Legal: An F Minus Collection.”

 

a Rafflecopter giveaway

 

This contest will end on April 26, 2016, at 12 a.m. CT. We will randomly select one winner and notify the winner via email on April 26, 2016.

 

While you wait to find out if you’ve won, click here to read F Minus!

 

The next giveaway will be announced on April 27, 2016 at 6 a.m. CT.





Transformation Tuesday: The Evolution of Comics

Thanks to their simplicity and prevalence, comics characters are some of the most easily recognizable figures around the world. In fact, thanks to their ubiquitousness, it’s easy to forget that certain long-running comics haven’t always looked the way they look now. Just because cartoon characters don’t age doesn’t mean they don’t change!

 

This #TransformationTuesday, we rounded up five of our favorite character transformations in comics.

 


1. Frazz (Frazz by Jef Mallett)

 

Frazz by Jef Mallett
Frazz by Jef Mallett

  

Frazz by Jef Mallett
Frazz by Jef Mallett

 

Everyone’s favorite golden-hearted janitor looks much the same as he did 15 years ago, but with a slightly different haircut and a broader forehead. One thing that’s consistently different in the strip: The T-shirt Frazz wears under his coveralls.

 

Read Frazz here!



2. Brain (The Awkward Yeti by Nick Seluk)

The Awkward Yeti by Nick Seluk
The Awkward Yeti by Nick Seluk

 

 

The Awkward Yeti by Nick Seluk
The Awkward Yeti by Nick Seluk


Before Heart and Brain became breakout stars, Brain was just a humble, grayish-pink organ who liked to torment Lars when Lars was trying to sleep. Now that Heart has taken on a more prominent role in The Awkward Yeti, he’s become a vibrant, salmon-hued character with square-framed glasses to denote his intellectual nature.

 

Click here to read The Awkward Yeti.

 


3. Rat and Pig (Pearls Before Swine by Stephan Pastis)

 

Pearls Before Swine by Stephan Pastis
Pearls Before Swine by Stephan Pastis

 

Pearls Before Swine by Stephan Pastis
Pearls Before Swine by Stephan Pastis

 

 

While Rat is largely unchanged, Pig’s head and body shape have rounded out, and his ears have taken on a teardrop shape. Also unchanged: Stephan Pastis’ trademark cynical humor.

 

Read more Pearls Before Swine here!



4. Charlie Brown (Peanuts by Charles Schulz)

 

Peanuts by Charles Schulz
Peanuts by Charles Schulz

 

Peanuts by Charles Schulz
Peanuts by Charles Schulz

 

We wouldn’t even recognize good ol’ Charlie Brown if they didn’t identify him by name in the first Peanuts strip! Thankfully, it didn’t take long for him to acquire his trusty zigzag shirt.

 

Click here for more Peanuts!



5. Jon and Garfield (Garfield by Jim Davis)

 

Garfield by Jim Davis
Garfield by Jim Davis

 

Garfield by Jim Davis
Garfield by Jim Davis

 

After almost 40 years in syndication, it’s no surprise that Garfield and Jon have undergone the most dramatic transformation on this list. Of course the two things that stayed the same are Jon’s fashion sense and Garfield’s insatiable appetite.

 

Read Garfield here!



Happy Transformation Tuesday!





COMICS SHERPA: EDITOR'S PICKS


This recurring LAUGH TRACKS feature highlights individual Sherpa strips and panels that for one reason or another caught the fancy of the aide de sherpa. It could be anything; the drawing, the writing, the humor, the coloring, that they tried something interesting, or that it's a new step for that particular creator.


We hope this quirky sampler will alert you to features you might not yet have noticed amid Sherpa's abundant, ever-changing, and eclectic mix, and that it gives Sherpa creators a modicum of helpful feedback.

 

 

 

All In Good Time  4-15-16

 

 

 

 

Bluebonnets  4-15-16

 

 

 

 

 

4-15-16

 

 

 

 

 

4-15-16

 

 

 

 

Blue Skies Toons  4-16-16

 

 

 

 

 

The Neighborhood  4-16-16

 

 

 

 

 

Dungeon Hordes  4-17-16

 

 

 

 

4-17-16

 

 

 

4-17-16

 

 

 

 

Inkwell Forest  4-18-16

 

 

 

A complete list of all the Sherpa features can be found here.

 

 





Happy 10th Anniversary, F Minus!

F Minus by Tony Carillo
F Minus by Tony Carrillo

 

On April 17, 2006, the first F Minus comic appeared in newspapers across the country. Ten years later, creator Tony Carrillo continues to amuse and entertain the masses with new F Minus strips every day.

 

To celebrate a decade of F Minus humorCarrillo put together a list of 10 things you may or may not already know about the stripincluding revealing the presence of subtle art history references and an explanation of Carrillo's penchant for making fun of St. Louis:

 

"I once drew a comic that featured a 'Visit St. Louis' mug. A resident of St. Louis felt I was making fun of his great city, and wrote me a long email explaining how wrong I was. Naturally, any time I need a city to make fun of, I now choose St. Louis."

 

Read the rest of Carrillo's list over at the F Minus blog.

 

Congratulations to Tony Carrillo, and here's to 10 more years of F Minus!

 

Click here to read F Minus from the beginning!





New Comic Alert! Dorris McComics by Alex Norris

Dorris McComics by Alex Norris
Dorris McComics by Alex Norris

 

Dorris McComics is a comic about comics. Featuring a stream of disposable characters who are tormented by the weird features of the comic medium, Dorris McComics provides life lessons through convoluted metaphors. The most tormented character of all is "Recurring Character," who is reluctantly dragged through many comics and never really has a good time.

 

Read Dorris McComics here!





Calvin and Hobbes Facebook Page Reaches 1 Million Followers

On April 14, the Calvin and Hobbes Facebook page hit the 1 million follower mark! To celebrate reaching such an impressive milestone, we asked readers to share their favorite Calvin and Hobbes strip from the archive.

 

We’ve rounded up a few of the most frequently shared strips below.



1. The first strip of the series. (November 18, 1985)
 

Calvin and Hobbes by Bill Watterson
Calvin and Hobbes by Bill Watterson

 

 

2. The monster in the hallway. (November 24, 1989)

  

Calvin and Hobbes by Bill Watterson
Calvin and Hobbes by Bill Watterson

 

 

3. Playing war. (March 23, 1986)

  

Calvin and Hobbes by Bill Watterson
Calvin and Hobbes by Bill Watterson

 

 

4. The dance party. (February 1, 1987)

  

Calvin and Hobbes by Bill Watterson
Calvin and Hobbes by Bill Watterson

 

 

5. Rainy day blues. (October 3, 1993)

 

Calvin and Hobbes by Bill Watterson
Calvin and Hobbes by Bill Watterson

 

 

6. Lucky rocketship underpants. (May 14, 1995)

  

Calvin and Hobbes by Bill Watterson
Calvin and Hobbes by Bill Watterson

 

 

 

7. The final strip. (December 31, 1995)

 

Calvin and Hobbes by Bill Watterson
Calvin and Hobbes by Bill Watterson

 

 


Hungry for more Calvin and Hobbes? Click here to explore the archive!





Meet Your Creator: Will Henry (Ordinary Bill, Wallace the Brave)

 

MYC_blog_header

 

The GoComics “Meet Your Creator” series brings you firsthand insight into the lives and careers of your favorite cartoonists. Each week, we hand over the keys to one of our talented creators, who share their inspirations, achievements, creative processes, studios and more! Read on to hear from this week’s featured cartoonist: Will Henry of Ordinary Bill and Wallace the Brave.

 

Hi, I'm Will, and I create the comic Wallace the Brave.

 

 

Wallace the Brave by Will Henry

 

 

It's a simple little comic about a boy named Wallace growing up in Snug Harbor. In my years of cartooning, I've had successes and failures, good ideas and bad, and they've all contributed to the creation of Wallace. Here's a bit of a snapshot of that journey:

 

First off, let's get some things out of the way. Yes, I've wanted to be a cartoonist since grade school. Yes, I grew up reading Peanuts, The Far Side, Garfield and Calvin and Hobbes. And yes, I draw my inspiration from everyday life. Even if I had a magic genie that gave me comic strip ideas, I wouldn't tell you about him.

 

On to the meat and potatoes ...

 

The Past

 

I got my first taste of "professional" cartooning my freshman year of college. The Daily Campus had a neat comics section. I created a comic, Room Mates, which ran three times a week. It was a typical college comic: two dormmates with different personalities and an alcoholic rat that lived in a pizza box. The pay was $15 a week. While not much, it could buy A LOT of Pabst Blue Ribbon. After some basic research, I sent a nice syndication packet to every editor who would agree to take a look at it.

 

I had quite a bit of confidence, and figured by Monday, I'd have a nationally syndicated comic strip, fat stacks of cash, and phone calls from Mick Jagger. Ohhhhh, William ... poor, young, foolish William.

 

After college

 

I launched Ordinary Bill, a comic based on my cat, my girlfriend Isis (now my wife) and me.

 

 

Ordinary Bill by Will Wilson

 

 

It was fun, self-examining and a bit silly, but it taught me loads about deadlines, defining an audience and character development. In retrospect, I spent too many years working on it. When it started, it was very raw, and as time went on, I tried to change its spirit to make it fit the needs of others – syndicates, newspapers and books.

 

This eventually turned it into an entirely different comic, one that sort of lost its most interesting and personal moments. I found I couldn't more fully explore the characters because it had a weak foundation, and since the characters were based on my wife and me, I felt I could never tackle some more defining storylines.

 

I was very proud of my comic Ordinary Bill, and at its peak, the comic was very well received ... probably because I touted it whenever and wherever I could.

 

It's funny, and this is something I believe many creators deal with, but now I'm literally embarrassed to show people the comic. I know I shouldn't be, and it was fun while I was focused on it, but now all I see are the flaws and missteps ... but, man, it taught me a ton.

 

I bought a liquor store in 2013. It's a cool little spot called Grapes and Gourmet in Jamestown, Rhode Island, and that's where I work when I'm not cartooning. I keep my drawing table there, which gets me outta the house and interacting with the outside world. Here's a shot of my drawing table:

 

 

Will Henry Drawing Table

 

 

The neighborhood kids often swing by to see what I'm drawing, and I find their comments refreshingly honest. I can't imagine their parents are too thrilled about their kids lingering in a liquor store. If you’re in the area, stop in and say hi!

 

The Present

 

I try to live in the present, but it's a very finicky time. It's tough to identify and it’s gone before you realize it. After I made the decision to cool down Ordinary Bill, my perception of cartooning changed. I wanted to create better work, and talk of syndication and generating income took a backseat to this. I began doodling a little boy running around barefoot, catching crickets and chasing seagulls. Simple sketches, maybe a little color and text, but mostly little scenarios that made me happy. They also made my wife happy. She loved this little cartoon dude. 

 

Here's a photo of Isis and me; we were married in 2014.

 

 

Will Henry

 

 

She's been dealing with this cartooning habit for the better part of a decade. Isn't she lovely ... WOOOHOO.

 

Anyway, I named the little boy Wallace, and drew about 30 completed comics with a few other added characters. There was Wallace, the curious daredevil; Spud, the neurotic best friend; and Amelia, the new girl ... she was trouble. Ordinary Bill never quite had a solid world in which the characters lived, so with Wallace, I tried extra-hard to give them a backdrop that didn't necessarily seem real, but consistent. I didn't have any plans to continue with Wallace, but my wife asked me to make some more. She took a liking to Wallace and even coaxed/demanded I send the sample to GoComics to see what they thought. I gave the comic the title Wallace the Brave and emailed the acquisitions editor the first 30 comics. From there, I went on my way, no longer waiting for the response I once obsessed over. But, as these things usually go, I got a response months after, and in June 2015, Wallace the Brave debuted on GoComics.  

 

My current cartooning process is not complex. I use classic pencil on Bristol board to sketch out the roughs. Then, I use some Micron pens and nib and ink, maybe some brushes, but that's about it. I scan the inked comic onto the computer and use a very old, very stolen version of Photoshop (what? it's expensive) to color the comics.

 

 

Image 5

 

 

I’ve also been known to break out the brushes and scratch the itch to do watercolors, another longtime interest.

 

I straight-up love cartooning, and at the moment, it's something that gives me a little bit of a voice. I do not live an extraordinary life. I live in a tiny, one-bedroom cottage and work at a liquor store, but every day, I have a little 14-by-5 inch blank space to be, and see, whatever I want. Spaceships, dragons, irate seagulls, tidal waves – anything! It can all live in my little blank space and I want to take advantage of that. It's mine and I can do whatever I want with it, and no one can tell me otherwise (actually, my editor usually makes me take out "F" bombs).

 

 

Image 6

 

 

My goal with Wallace is to highlight some of the simpler, stranger aspects of childhood while sprinkling in a bit of my own experiences. I want to create a fictional world where kids still collect bugs and fly kites and eat ice-cream cones upside down and jump from the docks and pick on each other and just do the weird things that kids do. Nothing is more boring than watching a kid use a smartphone, never mind reading a comic about kids using smartphones. I try to avoid that sort of material at all costs.

 

 

Image 7

 

 

I create Wallace the Brave under the name Will Henry in honor of my grandmother. My full name is William Henry Wilson, but there's a bunch of Will Wilsons in the family, so she calls me Will Henry. Often shouting, "WILL HENRY... bring me scotch." She also turned me on to some of my new favorite comics.  In my "adult" life I started reading more of classic comic strips, and am drawn to the strange things I find in Krazy Kat comics and the colors in vintage Gasoline Alley strips.

 

The Future

 

I'm often asked, "Hey buddy, what’s in your future?” I consider the question through two lenses: one for the future of comics, and another on a personal level. I don't believe comics are going anywhere. Obviously, the medium is changing, but I think it’s just a hiccup before we all get settled.

 

Hieroglyphics, stick figures and kids’ books have proven that people have always preferred their words with pictures. As a creator, but mostly as a consumer, I do think it's a shame what's happening to the comics page of newspapers, especially regarding legacy strips and reruns. If I turned on the television and saw nothing but reruns and shows from half a century ago, I’d probably stop watching TV, too.

 

Personally, I have no plans for Wallace. It's a strip I wholeheartedly enjoy working on. I see my family every time I read it, and I get to share my memories whenever I'm writing it. I truly love the craft. I suppose I keep doing it because tomorrow I can create a better comic than the one I'm working on today.

 

Read Wallace the Brave and Ordinary Bill. Follow Will on Twitter here.





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